Hi-Res images?

Discussion in 'Photographic Discussions' started by D-50, Nov 16, 2007.

  1. D-50

    D-50 TPF Noob!

    Joined:
    Feb 15, 2006
    Messages:
    1,043
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    New England
    Can others edit my Photos:
    Photos NOT OK to edit
    When people talk about giving clients a disc of High res images what does that mean? do you mean TIFFs?
     
  2. Mike_E

    Mike_E No longer a newbie, moving up!

    Joined:
    Jan 26, 2007
    Messages:
    5,327
    Likes Received:
    264
    Location:
    The Upper West Side of Mississippi (you have no i
    Can others edit my Photos:
    Photos OK to edit
    Whichever file the camera produced. A file that would be used to make prints.
     
  3. grafiks

    grafiks TPF Noob!

    Joined:
    Feb 8, 2007
    Messages:
    192
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    Orange County, CA
    Can others edit my Photos:
    Photos NOT OK to edit
    That means large size (lots of pixels) with a good dpi (like 300). Images suitable for printing.
     
  4. JIP

    JIP No longer a newbie, moving up!

    Joined:
    Aug 29, 2006
    Messages:
    3,019
    Likes Received:
    1
    Location:
    Pittsburgh PA
    Exactly, the same type of image you would print from. As opposed to an imge you might use to post on the web or one you would use as a proof.
     
  5. RyanLilly

    RyanLilly No longer a newbie, moving up!

    Joined:
    Aug 27, 2007
    Messages:
    1,478
    Likes Received:
    8
    Location:
    St. Louis, Missouri, USofA
    Can others edit my Photos:
    Photos NOT OK to edit
    TIFF is probably the best choice for quality, but many labs people will print at only accept JPG. however any quality difference will generally not be noticeable except for very large prints. and tiffs tend to be HUGE Files.
     
  6. TheLostPhotographer

    TheLostPhotographer TPF Noob!

    Joined:
    Jun 27, 2007
    Messages:
    128
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    A Magical City
    Dpi is totally irrelevant when it comes to talking about hi-res files. All that is relevant is the file size and format. Dpi only really comes into the equation when you're talking about output (on screen or, in print).

    Many photographic libraries insist on file sizes of at least 60MB. Personally, I consider anything over 1MB to be 'hi-res' or, anything above a 1024 screen based image file.

    Generally printed images are output at 300dpi (although new high definition printing technologies do allow for far greater dpi). Billboard advertisements are printed at a much lower resolution simply because they are viewed from a distance.

    TIFF has been the industry standard for many years amongst graphic designers and printers.

    The term 'hi-res' is a bit ambiguous to say the least. I've used to use labs that would scan film to low-res, med-res and hi-res files. Rarely was the hi-res good enough for printers requirements. It all comes down to output quality and the amount of information in a file.
     
  7. grafiks

    grafiks TPF Noob!

    Joined:
    Feb 8, 2007
    Messages:
    192
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    Orange County, CA
    Can others edit my Photos:
    Photos NOT OK to edit
    I spoke of dpi because I believe it was relevant to what the poster was asking. I wouldn't give a client a disk of files at a high pixel count, but saved at 72 dpi (and assume that they would know what to do with them). I would want them to be more "print ready".

    On the other hand, I would never give my set of high res images to a client at all.
     
  8. TheLostPhotographer

    TheLostPhotographer TPF Noob!

    Joined:
    Jun 27, 2007
    Messages:
    128
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    A Magical City
    Yes I understood that and think it is relevant to what the poster was asking. You're quite right - we all tend to think in dpi simply because we usually view images on screen in the first instance and then output on inkjets in the second.

    The point I was trying to make is that if a print of 3cm x 2cm was required for output then a file that was produced for 1024 screen output (at the standard 96dpi) would be more than adequate. It would be 'hi-res' even though the file size was relatively small.

    I'm told that the original standard of 76dpi was established within the world of typesetting and then adopted as the standard resolution on old 15" VDU's with 72 pixels square equal to a physical square inch of a 15" monitor set to 640 resolution.

    The idea of larger and smaller screen pixels is something some people struggle to grasp.
     

Share This Page