High ISO

Discussion in 'Photography Beginners' Forum' started by scottdg, Aug 19, 2007.

  1. scottdg

    scottdg TPF Noob!

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    Is there any artistic benefit to using higher ISOs? I know some people may like a little bit of noise in certain situations but I am wondering if there is any use for higher ISOs other than exposure control. I know I have used it in lower light situations when I want to use faster shutter speeds. But are there any situations I would want to use it in bright light?
     
  2. Hertz van Rental

    Hertz van Rental TPF Noob!

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    Depends on whether you are talking high ISO for digital or for film.
    With film using a high ISO to get grain can be useful for some images to get a texture or a grittiness. Particularly with B&W. This can give an edge or a quality to an image that works better than fine grain.
    I see no reason why the same cannot be true for digital.
     
  3. scottdg

    scottdg TPF Noob!

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    I was speaking of digital. That was the only situation I could think of is to add grain or noise.
     
  4. am_photoer

    am_photoer TPF Noob!

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    Digital noise is something to avoid and with bright light you can use a lower ISO. However, i guess there are a few reasons to increase your ISO, maybe from 100-400. That are to 1. allow you to increase your shutter speed more while keeping the aperture around the same. 2. To narrow your aperature while keeping a fast shutter speed --maybe if you arent steady yet or trying to catch alot of motion over a larger depth of field.

    So if you have a desired depth of field and want a really fast shutter speed you can add ISO so you don't have to widen aperture/decrease shutter speed.
     
  5. scottdg

    scottdg TPF Noob!

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    Okay. Thanks for the responses. That is pretty much what I thought.
     
  6. Digital Matt

    Digital Matt alter ego: Analog Matt

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    If you want a grain type look to a digital photo, you have much better options available to you in post production. You should always use the lowest ISO you can reasonably get away with, but remember; a noisy photo is better than a blurry one. (unless you are intentionally blurring)
     

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