high key high

Discussion in 'Graphics Programs and Photo Gallery' started by JohnMF, Oct 18, 2005.

  1. JohnMF

    JohnMF TPF Noob!

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    Hi, can anybody share some of the techniques they use in PS to create high key images. Every time i try it they always look wrong. Usually flat and blown out

    Thanks
     
  2. Meysha

    Meysha still being picky Vicky

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    What's high key mean in this situation?
     
  3. matthudd

    matthudd TPF Noob!

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    Im guessing by you saying "High-Key" you mean a light image (Mainly built up of whites and high end white mid-tones)?
     
  4. Digital Matt

    Digital Matt alter ego: Analog Matt

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    For a high key black and white image, I would convert to B&W using the channel mixer. Duplicate your channel mixer adjustment layer, and set its blend mode to "soft light", or for even higher key, "overlay". Your end result should be a very high contrast image, with very bright white skin tones.

    You can do the same for color, just do one channel mixer, and set its blend mode to soft light or overlay.
     
  5. JohnMF

    JohnMF TPF Noob!

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    Sorry, yes, that's what i meant

    Thanks i will try out your technique Matt
     
  6. Unimaxium

    Unimaxium TPF Noob!

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    Generally it's best to shoot a photo with the intent for it to be high-key -- that is, to expose it so you end up with mostly lightness in the image. It probably isn't as good to try to adjust the exposure later in photoshop. That might be why you're having trouble.
     

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