Hot Shoe flash

Discussion in 'Photography Beginners' Forum' started by hossmaster, Aug 26, 2008.

  1. hossmaster

    hossmaster TPF Noob!

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    Hello all,

    got a chance to play with a Nikon SB-800. I was able to snap this kiddo using a bounce. Mainly I just want to know if I am on the correct path with this type of advanced flash. Its a bit blurred, but the kid was moving, and composition was not factored in original shot.

    [​IMG]
     
  2. reg

    reg TPF Noob!

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    The flash *should have* stopped any motion.

    Hmm...
     
  3. hossmaster

    hossmaster TPF Noob!

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    I think I was the one moving, I had just taken a shot and this opportunity showed up. I am not too concerned with the motion, more concerned that I used the flash properly and is in a decent balance with color and exposure.
     
  4. epp_b

    epp_b No longer a newbie, moving up!

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    There's no EXIF on the image, what were your settings? It looks like you did the bounce pretty much right, though. The lighting is great with no redeye.
     
  5. Village Idiot

    Village Idiot No longer a newbie, moving up!

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    Unless the person metered for ambient. Then the flash exposure would be competing with the ambient exposure.

    OP - Next time shoot at ISO 200, f/5.6, and 200 shutter speed. Then you'll see the difference. Using a flash effectively gives you two exposures, ambient and flash. You have to keep that in mind that you have to learn to control both of them or learn to cut one or the other out to get desired results. Even if you were moving and the flash was doing it's job and you weren't metering for ambient, the subject would not be blurred. Some speed lights have a duration of as little as 1/30,000 at lower powers. That will definitely stop motion.

    also, check out.
    http://strobist.blogspot.com/2006/03/lighting-101.html
    http://www.lighting-essentials.com/
     
  6. Big Mike

    Big Mike I am Big, I am Mike Staff Member Supporting Member

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    Doesn't look like motion blur to me, it just looks slightly out of focus.
     

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