How are they doing their lighting? Help would be very appreciated

Discussion in 'Beyond the Basics' started by CaseJ, Jan 14, 2009.

  1. CaseJ

    CaseJ TPF Noob!

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    Hello everybody,
    I was wondering if anyone could help decipher how Bvlgari are making their photos look so good. First off let me explain that I'm a jeweler and I have been taking photo's of my work with my normal Panasonic DMC-T73 which I realize is not the greatest to begin with. I would like to make a investment in equipment to help make my work look more professional. Here is a link of the photo's I'm talking about
    Bvlgari
    I was shopping around and I stumbled upon this site, which showed some of the equipment that you could use, but I'm looking for something a lot more serious (Didn't care for the black surface in this kit vs. Bvlgari) and I completely understand it won't be cheap. "Black Ice" Jewelry Photography Kit

    So if you have any suggestions, or if you could point me in the right direction it would be greatly appreciated.
     
  2. Johnboy2978

    Johnboy2978 No longer a newbie, moving up!

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    Product shots like these generally make use of light tents such as this Smith-Victor | Three Light Fluorescent Kit with | 402057 | B&H

    As far as the actual lighting goes (e.g. number of lights, placement, etc) I can't answer that for you. There are several here who make a comfortable living doing it though who might happen upon your post.
     
  3. xposurepro

    xposurepro TPF Noob!

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    A light tent does come in very handy when shooting jewlery .. I can't tell you exactly how the Bvlgari photos were shot because they did not use the same setup on each shot .. they used a lighting setup that worked best for each piece of jewelry. I would search around for some nice light tent kits .. or put one together yourself .. that black ice kit you linked to looked overpriced in my opinion.
     
  4. JerryPH

    JerryPH No longer a newbie, moving up!

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    1 - VERY soft and diffused lighting.

    2 - Its not a point and shoot doing the shot, thats a guarantee.

    3 - Lighting, as mentioned, changes from pic to pic. Sometimes a single umbrella, sometimes 2 very soft diffused lights but I will mention that a majority are lit from above and slightly behind the subject axis in relation to the camera. Kinda interesting, but logical, if you look at the results.

    4 - A lighting tent may be possibly used, but it would have to be a little larger than what I traditionally associate with "tents", but I could just as easily see it being done without one.
     
  5. CaseJ

    CaseJ TPF Noob!

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    wow thanks everybody for the input. What type of surface do you think that is in the pictures? My largest concern in regards to bvlargi photos was how well the color of the gem stones look and how the facets of the stones are not washed out or all white from the flash which I believe you are saying they do that with the diffused lighting? Sorry I know these are some rookie questions but boy do I appreciate it.
     
  6. SpeedTrap

    SpeedTrap TPF Noob!

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    The base looks like wood stained black with a gloss finish (could be wrong) and the light source is cery large. The positioning of the main light is what gives the stones the look they do.
    I have done work like this before and it takes time to get it right. As well given the depth of field on these shots I would guess these were taken with a medium format with a very high f-stop
     
  7. tsaraleksi

    tsaraleksi TPF Noob!

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    I can't speak as to what format they used for the images but I'm going to make a guess that they were using macro lenses stopped way down in order to get such high-resolution shots of the fairly small jewelery.
     
  8. craig

    craig TPF Noob!

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    The Black Ice Kit you mentioned is a good start. As you work with it the items that you need will be a lot more clear. Post some shots that you have already taken and we can help further.

    As far as looking like Bulgari... If you are interested in that kind of quality hire a photographer or buy $50,000 worth of gear.

    Love & Bass
     
  9. CaseJ

    CaseJ TPF Noob!

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    Any recommendations on a good lens for a Canon 20D with just taking these jewelry pictures?
     
  10. craig

    craig TPF Noob!

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    Look into lenses with a tilt shift function.

    Love & Bass
     
  11. 250Gimp

    250Gimp TPF Noob!

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    IF the T&S lense is too much you should at least get a macro, such as the canon 100mm f2.8 macro, or the 60mm macro.

    It almost looks like the bulgari jewelry is on a piece of glass over the gloss black wood. I could be wrong though.
     
  12. Katier

    Katier TPF Noob!

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    I'm surprised your talking about such expensive gear. Surely some of the stuff strobist does would work very well for this type of shot and look just as good. I've not tried anything with off cam cheap flashguns but having seen the work that's been done it's encouraged me to try. From what I've seen there's nothing in those shots I'm sure can't be done with a £50 ( second hand ) flash gun and a tripod/light stand.. maybe a home made snoot or a cheap umbrella or both - etc. No need for a purpose made setup.
     

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