How can you tell if the lens is the problem?

Discussion in 'Beyond the Basics' started by zedin, Mar 15, 2006.

  1. zedin

    zedin TPF Supporters Supporting Member

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    I was out shooting some birds this weekend (well trying) but none of my shots really came out. I know a good deal of this was due to only having a 200mm lens for my d70s so I couldn't really get them frame filling. However for an egret I was able to get pretty close and fill most of the frame. I was shooting at f8 or 11 (depending on if it was in shadows or not) but the images where still soft. In addition I noticed a blue halo along the back of the bird. I don't know if it was because this area was the highlight section and being slightly blown out or if its because my long lens is not the best. (tamron 80-210 f4.5-5.6 if I recall right). I don't have the pic here at work but am wondering if anyone has a clue as to if it is the fact the lens is fairly cheap or if it is something else.
     
  2. Rob

    Rob TPF Noob!

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    Purple fringing tends to occur when there is a dark object against a light sky, whilst using a cheaper lens at the extent of its zoom.

    Bird and wildlife photography is frightfully difficult. The softness is either an inherent trait of your lens, or it is due to insufficient shutter speed and camera movement.

    The short answer is to buy an expensive lens which is capable of narrow apertures, allowing lower ISO, higher shutter speed and less camera shake. The workaround is to use a tri or mono pod and push up the ISO to 400 and shoot in AP mode with the aperture at its widest setting.

    Good luck

    Rob
     

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