how do i get the lighting correct??

Discussion in 'General Gallery' started by dstealthtt, Dec 29, 2003.

  1. dstealthtt

    dstealthtt TPF Noob!

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    Okay- i need advice on getting the correct lighting/metering when taking pics indoors. As you can see in the two example pics=-- they are both dark and their faces look red. I have the canon digital rebel and i have read that its built in metering system is great- but it didn't meter these worth a crap. So what can i do to make sure that pics come out when taken in doors? Any advice would help- thanks.

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  2. dstealthtt

    dstealthtt TPF Noob!

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  3. Tyjax

    Tyjax TPF Noob!

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    Dstealth,

    Your second picture shows real promise but as you say needs some lighting adjustment. The first shot is crooked and the main subject is centered and a little cropped. On to the lighting.

    I am not real familiar with the camera in question I tend to think the new digital rebel should produce much higher quality images than this. If you are shooting program mode or A-mode or S-mode it may be time to switch to manual. Also, I would think a newer cam such as this would have a bracketing mode or two. Try shooting a couple similar shots with EV +1.5 and EV -1.5 on either side of correct exposure. Next check your manual for how to switch from matrix or centerweited metering to spot metering. Sometimes its as simple as slightly depressing the shutter button. Meter off the darkest part of the scene and take several meter readings and average them. Some scenese may be so low lighted that you will not get pleasing results with out secondary lighting. For all that entails I recommend a web site called "The magic of lighting" I will do a search on Google and get the url. There are simply incredibly tips and tutorials. Its taking my studio work to the next level. I will post with more information as soon as I can. (I am at work. ) [/url]
     
  4. seanarmenta

    seanarmenta TPF Noob!

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    dstealth,

    the digi rebel does have a great metering system, better than the 10D in fact, but if you don't know how to use it, it really won't do you any good. remember, it's not the equipment -- it's the person using it.

    the best advice i can give you is to read up on basic photography. it will only help you make better photographs.

    if you compare the two shots you posted, you'll notice a different color cast between them. looks more like a white balance problem than anything else. what mode are you shooting in?

    sean
     
  5. ksmattfish

    ksmattfish Now 100% DC - not as cool as I once was, but still

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    I know very little about digital, but if this were film I'd say that the first pic is getting flash only light (electronic flash is blue) and that the second pic is getting more available light from the Xmas lights and room lights (tungsten lights are orange).

    Typically when I want to lose the blue cast of the flash I slow down the shutter so that the warmer room light will expose some; the slower the shutter the more orange it gets. You as the photographer must correct the camera as the camera knows only the quantity of light, not color of light. With film this can be done with a filter or in the lab (sometimes). With digital I think it's done by adjusting white balance, although it also could be done with filters or in Adobe PS (so you should still be able to correct for some of the cast).

    Along with this you need to know how your meter operates even if you are working on full auto. Do you have different meter modes? I'll assume these were taken on matrix-mode which measures the light on the entire image. The meter saw a whole bunch of light colored wall, and gave you the setting to take a nice middle gray pic of the wall, which means it underexposed making the pics darker (I'd say the walls are at least three stops brighter than middle gray, so even though the camera tends to give stuff in the center of the image more attention, the large area of white wall throws off the average).

    You need to either get in close to your subject or switch to spot meter, and meter only the important stuff. Manually set your camera to the recommended settings and then you can back up (but actually, take a few pics when you are up close). Or you could buy a 18% gray card and meter off of that.

    Also, front lighting, unless done with finess, reduces form and texture and isn't particularly flattering for most folks. It also tends to look "snap-shotty", because most pro portraits will use some sort of side lighting and point-n-shoots all have horrendous front lighting. Try bouncing the flash off the ceiling or look into getting a flash cord so you can hold the flash off to the side.

    And finally, YOU'RE SHOOTING DIGITAL!! You are getting instant feedback about your results and it only costs you battery juice to take a zillion pics. Start shooting and you'll figure it out. Your assignment is to fill your memory card everyday.
     

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