How do I keep my camera safe from the elements?

Discussion in 'Beyond the Basics' started by keller, Nov 25, 2005.

  1. keller

    keller TPF Noob!

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    I tend to take my small digital P&S everywhere I go, but since the weather around here is ALWAYS changing (it once went from dry heat to thunderstorm in 2 hours), I want to protect my camera from the elements.

    Some problems:
    -I'm always sweating, especially during long hikes, which means anything sticking to my body will soon be hot too
    -My camera doesn't have a "real" lens cover, just a thin piece of opening plastic cover that can be accidently bumped open
    -I carry water in my bag, which occasionally spills/leaks
    -The worst are dust clouds which are often kicked up, especially by cars and other people


    What's the best way to protect your camera from bumps, temperature changes, dust clouds, and other dangers during long camping trips? Should I stick the camera in some kind of special bag which can shield against these things?
     
  2. photobug

    photobug TPF Noob!

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    I'd recommend that you visit Lowepro's site and find a small camera pouch. The have several different styles and most are padded and/or weather resistant.

    Once you pick one hit ebay for decent prices.
     
  3. amoki

    amoki TPF Noob!

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    Definitely Lowepro pouches, look for those made with water-resistant fabrics (not all of them are, I think). Lowepro carry cases are great products, although their prices are a bit steep at times.

    I wouldn't be too worried about you getting sweaty or "heating up the camera", although putting a pack of silica drying agent in your case is advisable.
     
  4. DocFrankenstein

    DocFrankenstein Clinically Insane?

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    You get a weatherproof camera.

    What do you have right now?
     
  5. Big Mike

    Big Mike I am Big, I am Mike Staff Member Supporting Member

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    A camera bag would do quite nicely. I also recommend Lowepro, they have very good quality stuff and a wide selection. Some of their bags are available in an "AW" (all weather) version, with water resistant fabric and a built-in rain cover.

    I have a Lowepro backpack and when I was is Costa Rica (during the rainy season) the bag withstood the elements quite well.
     
  6. keller

    keller TPF Noob!

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    What about the whole hot/cold transition? I've read from books that if a camera goes from a hot place to a cold place, it could get wet inside. Is this only for film, or also digital too?
     
  7. darin3200

    darin3200 TPF Noob!

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    Probably for digital too because its just condensation which would mess up the camera.

    There is at least one or two cameras on the market now that are totally waterproof, you should check into them.
     
  8. Big Mike

    Big Mike I am Big, I am Mike Staff Member Supporting Member

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    When you go from hot to cold, you may get fogging on the outside, which does take a few minutes to clear off...but what you have to be careful of is going from cold to hot & humid. That will cause condensation to form inside and outside your camera.

    Coming from the cold outside,going inside to a warm house or car. Or even worse, being inside an air conditioned hotel room and going outside into a very hot & humid tropical type climate. I had to deal with a lot of condensation in Costa Rica.

    The trick is to let the camera change temperature gradually, and while sealed up. Put the camera into an air tight plastic bag (while still in the cold) and then let it warm up gradually before you take it out. If you don't have a plastic bag, keep it in a camera bag closed as well as possible.
     

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