How is this done???

Discussion in 'Beyond the Basics' started by gabelimom, Oct 3, 2007.

  1. gabelimom

    gabelimom TPF Noob!

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    http://www.rubyvan.com/catalog/index.php?main_page=product_info&cPath=65_75_83&products_id=331

    For the life of me, I cannot figure out how this was done. I was told that what is behind the model is not actually a studio grey backdrop, but a white wall. Can anyone tell me how this was lit?

    I am actually going to be shooting in this very same space, and want to replicate the light. I know that to the model's right is a wall with two small windows, and that's it. The room is quite small. I can see that there's a light to the model's left that is up high and pointing down on her, like a hair light. Is a snoot being used for her hair?

    Any help would be greatly appreciated!!!!!! :)
     
  2. Mr_Bester

    Mr_Bester TPF Noob!

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    Check out strobist.blogspot.com IIRC the light is closer to the subject than the "White" wall, so exposing the subject correctly under exposes the wall making it gray....
    Dug
     
  3. Johnboy2978

    Johnboy2978 No longer a newbie, moving up!

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    Looks like maybe a softbox camera left as the primary source with another light camera right for hair and separation from background or maybe just a reflector on that side?
     
  4. Garbz

    Garbz No longer a newbie, moving up!

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    Softbox camera left and up a bit, reflector camera right and bottom. Both are visible in her eyes.

    Another light provided for separation off camera right behind the model. This could also be the same light which is lighting the back wall. It looks soft so possibly translucent umbrella.

    Alternatively that's 2 lights above one for just the model and one for just the back wall.
     
  5. Sideburns

    Sideburns TPF Noob!

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    LOL ahaha! "Done it". I love it.

    Wish I could help, but all I could say would be that the white wall is underexposed, so there's probably lots of light going on the model, and barely any on the wall.
     
  6. ksmattfish

    ksmattfish Now 100% DC - not as cool as I once was, but still

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    To make a white wall appear middle gray use the settings your camera meter recommends. Light meters give the recommended exposure to make whatever they are pointed at middle gray. To make a white wall look white in a photo it must be overexposed from the meter's recommendation.

    Google "zone system", and read up on the basics of tonal manipulation.
     
  7. gabelimom

    gabelimom TPF Noob!

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    Thank you all SOSOSO much! I'm reading up on the zone system, thanks for the advice! GREATLY appreciated!
     
  8. Alpha

    Alpha Troll Extraordinaire

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    That's actually a poorly lit photo. Appears to be a rectangular softbox lower camera-left, and a hair light above and left of the subject. The shadows are unnatural...it's really quite amateur.

    As others have mentioned, not lighting the white background produces gray by default.
     

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