how to photograph an empty space...

Discussion in 'Beyond the Basics' started by eydryan, Nov 10, 2005.

  1. eydryan

    eydryan TPF Noob!

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    well, thing is i have to do this shoot (charity of course) of a shop for rental. and i have no idea what to do with it. just imagine an open space. and then me in it with a camera. what the hell am i supposed to shoot? and some tips maybe if you have like "use wide angle to create the impression of more space "and such...

    i dunno but 10x in advance to everybody who answers :) :hail:
     
  2. Marctwo

    Marctwo TPF Noob!

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    One thing I'd say about wide angles is they may give the illusion of a deeper space but they also make it look narrower. I'd stick to about 50mm or so to show the proper proportions.
     
  3. sparky

    sparky TPF Noob!

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    Well, depending on how big it is, you may NEED to use wide angle to get it all in.

    How are you planning to light it? Are there any big windows?
     
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  4. DocFrankenstein

    DocFrankenstein Clinically Insane?

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    LOL

    How about put an object of reference in it? Like a person...
     
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  5. eydryan

    eydryan TPF Noob!

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    well, ok marktwo, good point. thanks for your thoughts.

    it's probably not that big, i haven't seen it yet, but as a shop it's not that big. and i can break it down into pieces and not necesarilly shoot the whole thing as a whole. lighting is not an issue, these places always have either big windows (very probable) or fluorescent lighting which could light up a boulevard... :D so lighting probably won;t be a problem as i'm also shooting off a tripod naturally.

    also an interesting idea doc but what person because it's not really that professional to put a kid in nike in it and if i put the manager there it'll look weird i think. but i'll try, it's a good idea thanks.

    so thanks to all who have replied so far, all is noted and if anybody else has another idea or you guys come up with something else don't hesitate to just drop a reply :D

    rather OT: did you notice that nobody thought of writing a book about photographing an empty space :lol:
     
  6. craig

    craig TPF Noob!

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    If you have the time scope it out first and find out about the lighting. If you have your own bring it. Bring a level for the camera. Straight lines are very important to the perspective buyer. A variety of lenses will come in handy. You will literally be backing yourself into a corner. Flexibility will be important. Again nothing too wide. Distortion can be a killer in architecture photos. Obviously get the "soon as you walk in" shot perfect. Shots including the floors and ceilings will work out the best.

    Of course capture the character. I would be psyched if this a 15th century Romanian building with 4 huge windows. If it is a space in a mall plan on getting super creative with lighting etc. Personally I hate fluorescent lights.
     
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  7. eydryan

    eydryan TPF Noob!

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    well unfortunatelly i cannot scope it out it's unaccessible to me until the shoot but i'll ask my friend how it is. i'll only probably have my standard 35-80mm lens and a fixed 50mm lens or i'll take the digital with the 38-114mm compact. ok so two votes for not wide, so wide goes :D

    what do you mean by that "soon as you walk in" shot? like right when i enter? :D

    ok got it about the floors and ceilings.

    ok got it: size character and location :D

    thanks!
     
  8. craig

    craig TPF Noob!

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    Sounds like you have the lenses. From the entrance is generally the first thought and a good one. I would think of it as more than that. Could be that from the door is not the best spot. Maybe 5 steps to the right shows the window or corner better. Maybe through the shop window shows the room best. Keep in mind that you are trying to get some one to buy the space.
     
  9. eydryan

    eydryan TPF Noob!

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    aha ok... :D on it. i get the idea, shoot first impression.
    i dunno what people who want to buy a shop look for... but maybe room and light... eh well, i'll try to get it as best i can. ok so i got this tip too. got any more? :D

    oh and do you think i should shoot film or digital?
     
  10. craig

    craig TPF Noob!

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    More often then not the buyer does not know what he is looking for either. Like you said do your best and call it good. Digi or film should involve the client. If the shot is a three week newspaper ad shoot digi. If this a place that will attract high end clients I wold go with film. Of course if it is affordable shoot both.
     
  11. Rob

    Rob TPF Noob!

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    You could always be different and construct a 180 or 360 degree panorama by stitching 50mm shots together - that works well sometimes.

    Rob
     
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  12. eydryan

    eydryan TPF Noob!

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    yeah you're right craig.. i'll just do my best and see what i come up with. film is not affordable but if he wants film i'll make him pay for it naturally... thing is i work better with the eos than with the compact but... film costs...

    and rob nice idea i might just do that:D
     

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