how to take concert pictures?

Discussion in 'Beyond the Basics' started by debaser, Apr 7, 2006.

  1. debaser

    debaser TPF Noob!

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    the concept on how to do this just goes over my head. i did a few searches around here but there was nothing really specific to my camera found.

    anyway, what kind of settings etc can i change for photography at concerts? an example of a horrible attempt at a photograph at a concert is here. the exif data for said picture is also here. i did use a flash in the picture, i probably shouldn't have done.

    the camera is a sony dsc-w7. i don't want to buy a new camera anytime soon as i'm not a photographer and it would pretty much go to waste.

    basically, i know pretty much zilch about photography in general, so i hope someone here can help me out!
     
  2. Fate

    Fate TPF Noob!

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    maybe try using a higher ISO. The problem i see with it is a lack of rezolution, but im guessing that must be down to photobucket.
     
  3. darich

    darich TPF Noob!

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    put the ISO as high as the camera will allow. Do not use the flash - when you use the flash the exposure is cannot exceed around 1/200 depending on the camera. At large distances the flash is ineffective and the exposure too short and you get results like the ones you have. Your subject has to be fairly close to be properly illuminated by the flash.

    By not using the flash you force the camera to have a longer exposure and hopefully get the picture. However longer exposure means the possibility of a tripod. I know you don't want to use a tripod so the ISO has to go up and the aperture widened (smaller f number).

    I don't know your camera at all but you may find that to get a shot that is what you're after may be beyond the means of the camera.

    Try getting closer or what about getting chatty with the lighting guy? Maybe get the lights up a touch or even a spotlight on each bandmember for a few seconds and allow you to get a shot or two.
     
  4. Rob

    Rob TPF Noob!

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    Turn the flash off for starters - that's what has created that misty effect.

    As Fate has quite rightly said, up the ISO a bit to decrease shutter speed.

    Go in Aperture Priority mode if possible and force the lens wide open to get as much light in as possible.

    Looks like that shot is a touch mis-exposed. Try fiddling with +/- EV if your camera has a setting to adjust what the shadows look like.

    Try a mono-pod and see if you can use one - allows a longer exposure and steadies things.

    Buy a DSLR with a wide aperture prime lens! (if possible!)

    Rob
     
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  5. Big Mike

    Big Mike I am Big, I am Mike Staff Member Supporting Member

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    Welcome to the forum.

    Your photo is not all that bad. With some editing in a program like photoshop (or what ever) you could make it look a lot better.

    Concerts are a very hard scenario to photograph...it's just too dark and there is usually a lot of movement and quite often you can't set up yourself and/or your camera in ideal positions.

    As mentioned, turn up your ISO. This will give you noise , especially in the dark areas...but that's the trade off for higher ISO. Try to keep the camera as steady as possible. A tripod may be too awkward, so maybe keep it on a table or up against a post or anything to keep it from moving around while you take the photo.

    Concert photography is pretty subjective, it's not really wrong or right, good or bad. Some shots might be very blurry but convey the mood really well. Others may be sharp, but rather pointless. Keep shooting and figure out what you like. Do the best with the equipment you have.
     
  6. bigfatbadger

    bigfatbadger TPF Noob!

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