Hoya RM-72 photos?

Discussion in 'Photography Beginners' Forum' started by Markw, May 20, 2009.

  1. Markw

    Markw No longer a newbie, moving up!

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    I am thinking about gettig this filter, does anyone have any shots taken with it?

    Mark
     
  2. randerson07

    randerson07 TPF Noob!

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  3. rmh159

    rmh159 TPF Noob!

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    I have that filter and love it. The shots need some serious post-process love though to turn into anything worthwhile. Definitely a challenge but it's fun.
     
  4. rmh159

    rmh159 TPF Noob!

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    [​IMG]


    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]
     
  5. Markw

    Markw No longer a newbie, moving up!

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    Does anyone have any pictures taken with this filter straight from the camera? How do you know if the pictures are exposed correctly if they come off the camera all red?

    Thanks
    Mark
     
  6. rmh159

    rmh159 TPF Noob!

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    I use the histogram to determine proper exposure and then bracket like there's no tomorrow. I don't have any posted though to share.
     
  7. Josh66

    Josh66 Been spending a lot of time on here!

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    That's how I do it, lol.

    Here are a few to show you before & after custom WB (and the accompanying histograms):

    As-Shot:
    [​IMG][​IMG]

    Custom WB (the tree):
    [​IMG][​IMG]
     
  8. TamiyaGuy

    TamiyaGuy No longer a newbie, moving up!

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    Sorry to go off-topic a little bit, but I never knew IR photos needed such a radical change to look decent. Great work, I salute you!
     
  9. Josh66

    Josh66 Been spending a lot of time on here!

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    If I had set a custom WB while I was shooting, they would have came off the camera looking like the second one. WB was set to Daylight on the first one.

    If I knew the sky was going to look like that, I would have composed differently to include more of it. This was a longer exposure than I normally need for IR, it had a much greater impact on the movement of the clouds than I had anticipated.

    My LCD is broken, so I can't see any of my pictures until I get them on the computer.

    I don't think I'll know what to do when I get a new camera with a working LCD...lol.
     
  10. Markw

    Markw No longer a newbie, moving up!

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    So, Im confused what youre looking for on the histogram, and what bracketing is. I guess I should know these things..but if you could tell me, Id appreciate it.

    Mark
     
  11. Josh66

    Josh66 Been spending a lot of time on here!

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    I don't look at anything until I get it on the computer. By then, there isn't a whole lot you need the histogram for.

    The histogram shows you the exposure.
    The right side is the highlights, the left is the shadows.
    The top is more data, the bottom is less data. If part of the histogram goes off the top of the graph, that area is either completely blown out or so dark that there is no detail - depending on what end of the histogram it's on.

    If the histogram is mostly on the left side, you likely have an underexposed image - most of the data is one the dark end of the graph.


    Bracketing is when you take multiple exposures, at different settings.

    With IR, it's often hard to know ahead of time what your settings need to be. You can't see anything, and you can't use the meter either.

    Say that the "good" exposure is 15 seconds. You might want to bracket that by one stop and take an additional exposure of 8 seconds (one stop under) and 30 seconds (one stop over).

    I'll usually start at 5 seconds and take additional exposures at 5 second intervals up to 30 seconds.
     
    Last edited: May 23, 2009
  12. Josh66

    Josh66 Been spending a lot of time on here!

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    [​IMG]
    In this histogram, you can see that most of the information is on the 'bright' end, and that the red channel is getting close to being blown out (if it goes off the top, it's blown out).

    [​IMG]
    On this one you can see that the overall exposure is more in the middle - the brightest part (closest to the top) being the middle (neutral) section.


    What to look for...?

    I would look for a wide histogram, with data in all areas. I would want to get close to the top, but not go past it. If a small section goes over the top, it might be OK - sometimes it's OK to blow some details out.

    A "perfect" histogram would look more like this:
    [​IMG]
     
    Last edited: May 23, 2009

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