Humidity

Discussion in 'Photography Beginners' Forum' started by zbo2408, Jun 11, 2009.

  1. zbo2408

    zbo2408 TPF Noob!

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    For those of ya'll that live underwater like I do ... Well here in Charleston SC we have very high humidity and I always have to temper my lenses... I make multiple trips from inside to out to remove the humidity fog from the lens... It's always annoying and this morning a house on my street was on fire and I grabbed my camera to run outside and get some pics, more of the fire trucks than the house and since it was 0645 in the a.m. and there was a heavy due and I could not get my lens clear. When I went back inside my mini weather station tells me it's 95% outside...

    How do I deal with humidity fog on my lens ?!?!?
     
  2. farmerj

    farmerj TPF Noob!

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    keep them in the environment you want to operate in.
     
  3. zbo2408

    zbo2408 TPF Noob!

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    For some reason I don't think storing my lenses in 90-105* heat with consistent 60-85% humidity is going to be good for them.
     
  4. manaheim

    manaheim Jedi Bunnywabbit Staff Member Supporting Member

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    When you are changing temperature and humidity conditions on your gear, stick them into large zip-lock bags and wait for them to acclamate to the temp a bit before taking them out. I always keep 3-4 giant ziplocks in my camera bag. Works very well.
     
  5. farmerj

    farmerj TPF Noob!

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    I didn't say it would be good for them.


    The plastic bag is a good idea. It's more keeping it at temp than anything.

    It's the temp difference between your lens and the outdoors that's causing the condensation.

    How can a good ol' boy from Minnesota know about that?

    I used to wear glasses, and in the winter you would walk inside from -10 F to 70 F room temp. Instant fog over. Enough so, you actually would have a layer of FROST on your glasses.

    Try putting that lens (or a glass water glass) in your freezer sometime and pull it out inside the house. Same thing.

    Unless you keep it at the ambient temp outside, you will have condensation issues.
     

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