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    Capturing Distinctive Bird Images

I got spots...

Discussion in 'Photography Equipment & Products' started by Deadeye008, Sep 9, 2007.

  1. Deadeye008

    Deadeye008 TPF Noob!

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    I've noticed some spots on some pictures that I've taken. Is this dust on my sensor or something on my lense? My camera is a 30d that I bought new about 3 months ago and the lense I was using is my new Tamron that I got about a week ago. Here is a pic. Its an HDR. You can see the spots in the sky. Thanks. ***UPDATE**** I tried taking some pics with my 50mm lens and the same spots show up! This means I have dust on my sensor correct? Can I clean this myself or is it better to take it to a camera shop and have them do it?
    [​IMG]
     
  2. Big Mike

    Big Mike I am Big, I am Mike Staff Member Supporting Member

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    Yup, dust on the sensor. Try a search, sensor cleaning has been discussed many times and there is lots of good info already posted.
     
  3. If it is only a few spots, you may as well learn to get rid of them in Photoshop - I use the Healing Brush. Chances are you will always have a little dirt, and it is usually only visible in the sky, when using a tight aperture. If you're doing HDR work and re-sampling the same spot several times, obviously it will be quite defined.

    You could use a blower to try and dislodge the dust particle. Enter the Sensor Cleaning Mode, which flips up the mirror and opens the shutter. I prefer to do the whole three-step: blow it, then brush it using the Arctic Butterfly brush, and then I use specific swabs and a cleaning liquid made by VisibleDust, the same company that makes the Butterfly brush.

    You will hear a lot of warnings about cleaning your own sensor. Your sensor is not actually out in the open - it is attached to the back of a piece of glass. It is not THAT sensitive. So if you're a reasonably sensitive person you should have no problem cleaning it.

    Oh, and once it's clean, don't change lenses in a dusty environment. And don't lean over your camera - chances are that's a piece of dandruff.
     
  4. Deadeye008

    Deadeye008 TPF Noob!

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    Thanks you two. I'll try and use the heal brush to fix these pics that I took and then I'll have to get some sensor cleaning supplies.
     

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