I have a question/suggestion for you pros

Discussion in 'Photography Beginners' Forum' started by tkme4ard, Jul 2, 2007.

  1. tkme4ard

    tkme4ard TPF Noob!

    Joined:
    Jul 16, 2004
    Messages:
    133
    Likes Received:
    0
    would you mind showing typical shots of 'mistakes' that are made that would make a good learning curve? Two shots posted side by side one of a good shot one of a bad shot say with noise, hot spots etc. or one prior to a PS work up and one after.

    Anyone up for this?

    Also can someone tell me how I fix this problem that I tend to have? I shoot in the evening or morning or in the shade/shade but I still tend to have dark faces. If I change the aperture to allow more light, I get a blurry picture.

    dark face
    [​IMG]

    overcast, dark faces
    [​IMG]
    same day different shot better color
    [​IMG]
     
  2. JIP

    JIP No longer a newbie, moving up!

    Joined:
    Aug 29, 2006
    Messages:
    3,019
    Likes Received:
    1
    Location:
    Pittsburgh PA
    Well one suggestion I can give you right off the bat is that you could use some fll-flash in the first two.
     
  3. tkme4ard

    tkme4ard TPF Noob!

    Joined:
    Jul 16, 2004
    Messages:
    133
    Likes Received:
    0
    thats what I was wondering about. If I needed to work on my settings or would it be beneficial to get a flash (next)

    thank you JIP

    Angela
     
  4. WDodd

    WDodd TPF Noob!

    Joined:
    Feb 20, 2007
    Messages:
    899
    Likes Received:
    1
    Location:
    Amherst (Cleveland), Ohio
    Can others edit my Photos:
    Photos OK to edit
    If you are getting blurry pictures when you change the aperture I would guess that your shutter speed is becoming too slow for hand holding. At that point I would either bump up the ISO (if you have to hand hold) or use a tripod.

    You might be able to get away with using a reflector instead of a fill flash in the first 2, and IMO especially the first one.

    Just my $.02 hope it helps!

    Will
     
  5. ksmattfish

    ksmattfish Now 100% DC - not as cool as I once was, but still

    Joined:
    Aug 25, 2003
    Messages:
    7,021
    Likes Received:
    34
    Location:
    Lawrence, KS
    Can others edit my Photos:
    Photos NOT OK to edit
    dark face: The problem is that the bright white of the clothing is fooling the meter into under exposing. Over expose a bit and/or use fill flash or a reflector.

    overcast, dark faces; same problem, but fooled by bright sky.

    same day, different shot: tonal range of the scene is pretty even, so the meter does an okay job.

    Understand that your meter is always recommending the exposure to get medium gray. If you meter something bright it will under expose. if you meter something dark it will over expose.
     
  6. Garbz

    Garbz No longer a newbie, moving up!

    Joined:
    Oct 26, 2003
    Messages:
    9,713
    Likes Received:
    203
    Location:
    Brisbane, Australia
    Can others edit my Photos:
    Photos NOT OK to edit
    Use a silver reflector (can be had for a jar of pennies) to bounce light onto their faces. It gives a better shot then fill flash. If you are going to fill flash play with the settings a bit. On camera flash gives very flat lighting so it's important to tone it down so as not to kill the natural theme.
     
  7. Christie Photo

    Christie Photo No longer a newbie, moving up!

    Joined:
    Jan 7, 2005
    Messages:
    7,006
    Likes Received:
    67
    Location:
    Kankakee, IL
    Here's a low-tech suggestion: squint.

    Really... it can be helpful when you are learning to "see light." Before settling on a setting, squint your eyes (f22) to help see the lighting ratio. I know it sounds silly, but it will help see just where the light is falling.

    I hope this helps.

    Pete
     
  8. Stretch Armstrong

    Stretch Armstrong TPF Noob!

    Joined:
    Mar 31, 2007
    Messages:
    254
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    Alabama
    Can others edit my Photos:
    Photos OK to edit
    Pete, your suggestion reminds me of putting Christmas lights on the tree. I have always done that to see where the light is dim on the tree. I learned this from my parents.

    Good suggestion and reminds me of nice memories too.:thumbup:
     
  9. crownlaurel

    crownlaurel TPF Noob!

    Joined:
    Jun 6, 2007
    Messages:
    208
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    Southeast
    Can others edit my Photos:
    Photos OK to edit
    Stretch I don't know how old you are, but if it's anything within a decade of me, then you'd have to squint more than your parents did, LOL. We used to have some honking lights on our trees.
     
  10. tkme4ard

    tkme4ard TPF Noob!

    Joined:
    Jul 16, 2004
    Messages:
    133
    Likes Received:
    0
    the reason for the above is I'm really wondering if I truelly don't have en eye to see the wrong <sigh>

    I'm blind in my right eye. I'm concerned I won't see what you see know what I mean?

    angela
     
  11. Christie Photo

    Christie Photo No longer a newbie, moving up!

    Joined:
    Jan 7, 2005
    Messages:
    7,006
    Likes Received:
    67
    Location:
    Kankakee, IL
    So, Angela... you see with one eye... like a camera.

    Don't fret. You see what we all see. You just need to develop your awareness of what you're seeing. It may take some time. Some folks get it sooner than others, but we can all learn to do it.

    Pete
     
  12. AUZambo

    AUZambo TPF Noob!

    Joined:
    Jan 14, 2007
    Messages:
    573
    Likes Received:
    6
    Location:
    Birmingham, AL, USA
    Can others edit my Photos:
    Photos OK to edit
    I'm not a pro by any means - which is probably why I keep making this mistake - but my most common mistake is forgetting to check the settings before firing away. I'm so use to automatic cameras that I just start shooting away. After 2 or 3 pics when I check the display I'll see that I've either grossly over or underexposed an image and I have to start over.
     

Share This Page