I want a special portrait in large format...

Discussion in 'Photographic Discussions' started by DocFrankenstein, Aug 3, 2006.

  1. DocFrankenstein

    DocFrankenstein Clinically Insane?

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    I will get a cambo with a 90mm lens on it.

    What I want to shoot is a portrait with both of the eyes and the mouth in focus.

    The lens is a schneider 90mm super angulon. the f/8 version.

    What movements should I use? I don't want to distord the face. I am planning on shooting wide open.

    What difference does the rotation of the front standard make about the lens axis?

    Can anyone please give me a FAQ
     
  2. markc

    markc TPF Noob!

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    This might helps some: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/View_camera

    I would think that a 90mm on a large format camera is a bit wide for a portrait unless it's an environmental portrait, with the emphasis on environment. I think around 210mm+ is considered telephoto for a 4x5, and normal is about 150mm.
     
  3. Christie Photo

    Christie Photo No longer a newbie, moving up!

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    If you keep the both the film standard and lens standard parallel to each other, you will minimize distortion.

    The 90mm is pretty wide for 4x5. About like using a 28mm lens on a 35mm camera. (NICE lens, though)

    The 210mm (8 1/4") is a much better choice for portraits, but could be longer yet. It's 35mm equivalent is somewhere around 63mm.

    I'm not really sure what you're asking here. When you rotate the lens standard, you vary the plane of focus. So, swinging the front standard will throw the left and right sides of the image out of focus UNLESS the subject too is turned. I don't know if I'm making any sense, but you can see it on the ground glass.

    I hope this helps.

    Pete
     
  4. DocFrankenstein

    DocFrankenstein Clinically Insane?

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    I know, but I'm buying the cameara and it was used for architecture. The 90mm is the only lens that comes with it. It's better to have a wide and then crop than a tele and be stuck with it... imo


    I will probably get an LF tele sometime in the future if I enjoy the thing. But now I can pick up a decent camera for a reasonable price.

    I've read a few articles now and I guess my question is:

    The rail is pointing in the direction of the face. I can tilt/swing only the front standard and leave the rear standard perpendicular to the rail.

    Or I can make the rear standard parallel to the front standard.

    Which one will give me... "no additional distortions" of the face?
     
  5. ksmattfish

    ksmattfish Now 100% DC - not as cool as I once was, but still

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    Just google "view camera movements" and "Scheimpflug principle".

    Rotating the standard around the lens axis wouldn't do anything, as that's just turning the lens in place. You can rise: raise or lower the lens/film plane vertically. Shift: slide the lens/film plane from side to side horizontally. Tilt: tilt the lens/film plane forwards or backwards vertically. Swing: swing the lens/film plane to either side horizontally. There are a lot of possible combinations. Depending on the camera you may even have more options such as a drop bed or monorail.
     
  6. Christie Photo

    Christie Photo No longer a newbie, moving up!

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    When using such a short focal legnth lens like this, most distortion will occur when placing the subject near a corner of the composition. No camera movements will help this.

    I suggest keeping the both standards plumb. If you tip the camera forward on the tripod, re-plumb both standards and position the subject in the frame using the rise/fall of the lens standard.

    Pete
     
  7. Philip Weir

    Philip Weir TPF Noob!

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    Forget it !!! If you are shooting on a 5x4 with a 90mm wide angle of just the face, you will be too close to even light the subject. If you are further back so you are able to light the subject properly, you might as well shoot on 35mm or 120. Forget any movements, while setting them through the camera back, by the time you then set your lens and close up, put in your film, the subject, unless he/she is bolted to the spot, they will pull out of focus. I could comment on previous posts, but suggest you wait until you get a longer lens.
     
  8. craig

    craig TPF Noob!

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    Sounds like a fun idea. Shooting wide open poses it's own problems why not stop all the way down? Certainly that will take care of a lot of focus issues.

    Since you are shooting wide open; the key is too position the center of the lens at the bridge of the nose or wherever you perceive the center of the subject to be. Movements will depend on the subjects face. Keep in mind that the front element controls focus. The rear controls controls distortion. At this point you end up memorizing the "Scheimpflug Theory"

    Of course; what you see on the ground glass is what you see on film. It is hard speaking about it without being there to show you. Believe it or not the camera and lens movements will soon become second nature.
     

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