ideas on how to take pictures for a interior decorator

Discussion in 'Photography Beginners' Forum' started by Foxtrot_01, May 6, 2009.

  1. Foxtrot_01

    Foxtrot_01 TPF Noob!

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    Hello all,
    I dont know what is the right terminology but my friend is an interior designer and she asked me to help her out by taking pictures on a apartment that she decorated, she is a interior designer and she is trying to build a webpage and add some pictures. I am new to photography and told her that I was no expert but she is willing to give me a shot(although she is not paying me LOL). Any suggestions on lighting(what is the best time to shoot, am I looking at flash photography? reflectors?) what are the best angles for structures for interior design photography. I have limited equipment(Canon 40D and a 28-105mm lens), I know its not much but any ideas, suggestions will be appreciated.

    Thanks.
     
  2. Billhyco

    Billhyco TPF Noob!

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    sorry I am of no help but I am very interested in the response you get
     
  3. Village Idiot

    Village Idiot No longer a newbie, moving up!

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    Flashes would probably be your best bet. Lighting won't necessarily be even or consistent so maybe two or three cheap off camera flashes with radio triggers. A setup like that might end up costing you about $500 for everything though.

    You'll have to get the light power ratios down and you may need to buy gels to match the white balance of the flash. Flashes are set to match daylight which is white, about 5600 Kelvin in color temperature. Standard incandescent bulbs can have an orange tint to them as flourescents can have a green tint. You'll have to match the correct gel to the ambient light to get the right condition.

    It can be expensive and if you're not planning on doing anything with strobes afterwards (which would be a shame), then it might be worth it just to use a tripod and catch the room as best you can.

    Links. Check out the first two definitely.
    Strobist: Working Around the House
    Strobist: Scott Hargis Interview Tonight: 8 p.m. PT
    Strobist: One-Light Real Estate Photography
    Strobist: Saddled With Extra Work
    Strobist: Working Around the House
     
  4. Dwig

    Dwig TPF Noob!

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    In a way, this type of work is "product photography" and since she intends on using the images to sell her work you need to be very, very careful about adding any additional lighting. If lighting is part of her service it is critical that you do nothing to make any visible change in the lighting. Adding lighting must be limited to broad fill lighting that leaves no new shadows and doesn't change any of the mood of the existing lighting.
     
  5. Wedding92

    Wedding92 TPF Noob!

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    I have seen some interesting sites where you get some very classic themes for any occasion and category. You can google out too many sites with the keywords as you need. Feel free to visit my site for wedding occasions.
     

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