Image Dimensions vs. Print Size and Cropping

Discussion in 'Photography Beginners' Forum' started by Guido44, May 7, 2009.

  1. Guido44

    Guido44 TPF Noob!

    Joined:
    Nov 15, 2008
    Messages:
    190
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    Near Chicago.
    Can others edit my Photos:
    Photos OK to edit
    Hi all,

    Can anyone point me to a good link (or advice) on image dimensions vs. actual print sizes. What I mean is, how the actual each photo will be cropped with regard to each individual print size?

    I did some test prints yesterday, and I was a little disappointed that depending on the print dimensions, my shots had about 5 or 10% of the top and bottom cut off, or the edges.

    Is there a preferred image size? Do you limit the prints sizes available to clients to avoid screwing up (cropping) your work?

    My D300 takes originals at 2848 x 4288.

    Thanks,

    dan
     
  2. Big Mike

    Big Mike I am Big, I am Mike Staff Member Supporting Member

    Joined:
    Dec 16, 2003
    Messages:
    33,822
    Likes Received:
    1,811
    Location:
    Edmonton
    Can others edit my Photos:
    Photos NOT OK to edit
    It's just a matter of simple ratios.

    The common print sizes do not have the same aspect ratios, so there will need to be cropping for those different sizes. Most DSLR cameras shoot with a native ratio of 2:3, good for 4x6 or 8x12 prints...but there will be cropping for 5x7 or 8x10 prints.

    So are you asking about size files to give the clients?

    I think the common practice is to give them 2:3 files, but leaving enough 'space' in the photos for 8x10 cropping.
     
  3. KmH

    KmH Helping photographers learn to fish Supporting Member

    Joined:
    Apr 9, 2009
    Messages:
    38,240
    Likes Received:
    5,009
    Location:
    Iowa
    Can others edit my Photos:
    Photos OK to edit
    You might google 'aspect ratio". I think Wikipedia.org has a fairly good writeup on aspect ratio too.

    The most common image aspect ratios are 2:3, 4:5 and 5:7. The ratio is the short side to the long side of the image. In the 2:3 aspect ratio the long side is 3 units, the short side is 2 units. Expressed another way, the long side is always 1.5 time the short side. 4:5 the long side is 1.25 times the short side and 5:7 the long side is 1.4 times the short side.



    2:3
    • 4x6
    • 6x9
    • 8x12
    • 10x15
    • 16x24
    • 20x30
    • 24x36
    4:5
    • 8x10
    • 16x20
    5:7
    • Wallets
    • 5x7
    • 10x14
    • 20x28
    There are some other aspect ratios out there like 1:1 which is square.

    The issue of image size to actual print size refers to output resolution which is expressed as pixels per inch (ppi). Output resolution is only valid when it is used relative to the linear dimensions of an image.

    Your cameras output size, 2848 x 4288 is not a linear dimension (like inches) it is a spatial dimension (pixels). There is no standard pixel size.
     
  4. ANDS!

    ANDS! No longer a newbie, moving up!

    Joined:
    Nov 14, 2006
    Messages:
    2,178
    Likes Received:
    3
    Location:
    Downtown
    Can others edit my Photos:
    Photos OK to edit
    Doing too much work. If you are using Photoshop, simply set the dimensions of your crop tool to your printers output and then crop as needed (making sure to keep the desired DPI). No need to remember rations of sides and all that wonky nonsense.
     
  5. Dwig

    Dwig TPF Noob!

    Joined:
    Mar 11, 2009
    Messages:
    1,261
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    Key West FL
    Can others edit my Photos:
    Photos NOT OK to edit
    Quite true, but ...

    ... all common digital images use square pixels and all common sensors use square photosites. Thus, the pixel "dimensions" of your image can be used to determine the aspect ratio of your image. The 2848x4288 mentioned has a 2:3 aspect ratio.

    When dealing with borderless prints you also have to keep in mind that it is MANDITORY for the printer to spill some image past the edge of the print to allow for minor tracking errors as the paper moves through the printer. As a result, there will be some cropping on all edges even when you match the image and print aspect ratios. My HP B9180 "crops" about 2-4% of the image by linear measure.
     

Share This Page

Search tags for this page
2848x4288
,
2848 x 4288
,

4288 2848

,
4288 x 2848
,

4288 x 2848 aspect ratio

,

42882848

,
cropping photos to standard sizes
,
image size versus actual print size
,
size vs dimensions in photo gallery
,
standard photo size dimensions