Important Health & Safety Information

Discussion in 'The Darkroom' started by Hertz van Rental, Mar 20, 2005.

  1. Bobby Ironsights

    Bobby Ironsights TPF Noob!

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    :thumbup:


     
  2. montresor

    montresor TPF Noob!

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    Y'all probably know this already, but the two lead docs linked herein don't print out perfectly, there's a lot of right margin overhang. If you can't get your computer to re-size it, try what worked for me -- edit:select all:copy.

    Open a word processing document and paste. Woo-hoo! All correctly justified.

    Now I need to find the best price on hazmat suits! :stun:
     
  3. RedStarRevels

    RedStarRevels TPF Noob!

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    GOOD GOD! It's a wonder I'm alive...GLOVES!?! Never even thought about wearing them. I'm self taught, so I have a lot of darkroom bad habits...Like drinking and smoking while printing. Six Guinness can make it very difficult to tell whether or not an image is in focus! I'm going to give these sites a good read, thanks mate.
     
  4. christopher walrath

    christopher walrath No longer a newbie, moving up!

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    I have a dorky looking rubber apron, at least covers over my footwear, protective glasses (as I sweat like the dickens under goggles) and, if mixing chemicals from a stock solution, a half face respirator (you can pick these up cheap enough from auto parts stores that sell paint).
     
  5. shootLib

    shootLib TPF Noob!

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    well ... i have been sticking my hands in the chemicals for awhile now.
    i hope i havent caused any damage. and i can't say that i actually want to stop and used something to protect myself. time consuming.

    but....now i have little concern...
     
  6. sunshinedaydream

    sunshinedaydream TPF Noob!

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    I do it too, i hate using tongs...and who wants to wear thick rubber gloves? but I've learned my lesson about sticking your hands in the sepia toning chemicals. Three fingers on my right hand look so brown and dirty, and it won't go away!!!
     
  7. lisa_13

    lisa_13 TPF Noob!

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    i almost don't want to read anything on the website that is in all papyrus...
     
  8. compur

    compur No longer a newbie, moving up!

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    Dipping ones hide in metol type developers can cause an ugly and painful
    allergic skin rash after years of doing this. I've seen it on others.

    I use a surgical type rubber glove on one hand for times when I must poke my
    fingers in the soup. They are cheap.
     
  9. maris

    maris TPF Noob!

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    The information qouted in the links is both correct and amazingly irrelevant to the needs of people working in an amateur darkroom.

    The lists look like what anyone could cobble together from reference sources like the Merck Index or the CRC Handbook. Most of the items listed are not used by any photographers working in a modern darkroom and probably represent a compendium of things that may have been tried at one time or another in the past. Also very conspicious is complete absence of discussion (probably reflecting complete ignorance) about actual photographic processing practice.


    You need to know all this stuff if you intend to set up a chemical engineering factory to manufacture photographic processing solutions from pure raw materials. Otherwise it is largely alarmist folderol.

    The photographic developing solutions that ordinary people can buy in shops are weak alkalis, weak reducing agents, with rare allergy potential for sensitive people. Compared to scented bath soap photographic developers are very safe, mild, and unlikely to cause a rash.

    Photographic stop bath is an acetic acid solution weaker than pickle vinegar, another acetic acid solution. People eat pickle vinegar!

    Photographic fixer is a solution of ammonium thiosulphate which is far far safer than ordinary laundry bleach or toilet cleaner. And so on...

    Common sense and actual information about practical photochemistry is a better source of darkroom safety.
     
  10. terri

    terri Administrator Staff Member Supporting Member

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    Hertz is neither alarmist or ignorant, and the links have been there for some time with no one crying foul. To somehow imply this post, in offering links to get people reading and thinking about safety procedures in the darkroom, is somehow irresponsible and doing us a disservice, is absurd.

    You wouldn't take a deep whiff of acetic acid, though, would you? :er: Of all the things you just went off about, this might be the most dangerous thing you've said.
     
  11. CW Jones

    CW Jones TPF Noob!

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    I feel this thread should have been made, and locked as to keep chatter and fallacy to a minimum...

    Let people add links and facts via PM to a mod or something.
     
  12. maris

    maris TPF Noob!

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    Hertz is OK but the links are poor because they don't get people reading and thinking about safety procedures in the darkroom. The hazard data in the links does not connect to the actual photochemistry that people encounter in the darkroom. It should.

    There is a modern trend toward alarmism and an overestimation of actual hazards. I noticed this years ago when I was a consultant for Eastman Chemicals (the chemical engineering arm of Kodak). As the "hot-line" guy I would get 'phone calls about developers, stops, and fixers from spooked amateurs and I can't recall an unequivocal case of chemical injury. The people at most risk were in the professional processing labs where they actually handled stuff like glacial acetic acid. Amateurs could not (and should not) get stuff like this without an appropriate chemical handling ticket, a hazmat clearance, and a training course. The big pro labs had eye wash stations, safety showers, spill control kits, antidotes, and "disaster" procedures. I made sure they did. Home darkroom formulae were specifically made in small packages with a big safety factor in mind.

    Later I did scientific research in toxicology at a government laboratory and had the sobering experience of watching thousands of animals die in the cause of knowledge. Chemical poisoning is a grim business but in everyday life it is hard to encounter accidentally. There is a wall of laws and restrictions for public access to laboratory style chemicals. And it's those laboratory and industrial chemicals that the links at the top of this thread refer to. But what if you are standing in front of a tray of rapid fixer in a regular darkroom; what's the hazard there? The links have absolutely nothing to say!

    A whiff of glacial acetic acid is dangerous but I can't get glacial acetic acid and I expect most of this forum's members don't have the legal clearances either. Those that can get it should know it and fear it. Home darkroom stop-bath concentrate is a nasty smell which you won't want to repeat. But you won't die. A dilute working stop bath is weaker than pickle vinegar.

    By way of comparison ordinary laundry bleach is terrifying. Every year scores of people (mostly children) die, suffer mutilation or go blind from it.

    I urge darkroom workers to get the real facts from the manufacturers themselves. If you use D-76 developer ask Kodak, about ID-11 ask Ilford, for SB-50 stop bath ask Fotospeed and so on.... The links at the top of this thread don't really inform you about what to buy, how to mix it, and how to use it so you stay safe.
     

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