Important Health & Safety Information

Discussion in 'The Darkroom' started by Hertz van Rental, Mar 20, 2005.

  1. terri

    terri Administrator Staff Member Supporting Member

    Joined:
    Sep 2, 2003
    Messages:
    27,011
    Likes Received:
    2,695
    Location:
    In the mental ward of this forum
    Can others edit my Photos:
    Photos NOT OK to edit
    It's easy to join a forum and spout off, which is all you're doing so far.

    Since you claim to have consultant experience, why not offer up some helpful links yourself on the subject and contribute to this thread in a more positive way?

    Thanks.


     
  2. HowToDevelopFilm

    HowToDevelopFilm TPF Noob!

    Joined:
    Jun 17, 2010
    Messages:
    5
    Likes Received:
    0
    Can others edit my Photos:
    Photos NOT OK to edit
     
  3. jasonphoto

    jasonphoto TPF Noob!

    Joined:
    Aug 2, 2011
    Messages:
    44
    Likes Received:
    1
    Can others edit my Photos:
    Photos NOT OK to edit
    thans a lot for this info,,
     
  4. unpopular

    unpopular Been spending a lot of time on here!

    Joined:
    May 17, 2011
    Messages:
    9,424
    Likes Received:
    1,972
    Location:
    Montana
    The concentration of acetic acid in stop bath is about 7%, slightly more than white distiller vinegar. Stock solutions are at 30%, which might be a bit more of a concern. I don't know about Australia, but you can get glacial acetic acid in the united states pretty easily. It is a very harmful acid, but not, as far as I've known, controlled. I do not even think it's a dea list chemical, like silver nitrate is, and you can still get clearance pretty easily for that, and most other common photo chemicals that are listed. It's just a matter of telling the DEA who you are and where you live. Most retailers handle this for you and all you have to do is fill out a form.

    Fixer is metabisulfite or thiosulfite, which is pretty safe, and is used as an benign sterilizer in food and beverages. I used it to clear ammonia in our cats litter box. It can be found at any brewshop, and I've never seen any warnings on it. It irritates the mucus membranes pretty bad, but I don't think it's toxic, especially not in a solution.Clearing agents are sodium sulfite, which I am not totally familiar with but I doubt is excessively toxic. Both sodium sulfite and metabisulfite have a health rating of 2.

    I have all these msds in storage with my chemistry set. If anyone wants more specific information I can get them out.

    Developers are very broad, but primarily are combinations of two chemical, metol and hydoquinone. They typically also contain potassium bromide and potassium or sodium hydroxide to increase pH. All of these chemicals are relatively toxic when taken internally over a long period of time. Potassium Bromide, an anticonvulsant used in Europe, was taken off US markets due to bromide buildup in the blood. It is difficult to dose over the long term. However, the amount of bromide in developer is very small, something like one gram per gallon of stock (I think, it's been a while). Potassium Bromide is often prescribed in greater than one gram amounts for seizures.

    Metol and Hydroquinone are both known carcinogens over prolonged acute exposure. I'm not an expert, but I wouldn't be too worried about then unless you work for Illford or Kodak. Gloves should be plenty enough protection. Both are very water soluble. Other developers, like Pyrocatechol are another matter, and are extremely toxic.Potassium and sodium hydroxide are used only to adjust pH. Both of these chemicals are very caustic and will burn you, but not at the concentrations of prepared developer.

    While daily photochemistry is prob. Pretty safe, be aware that concentrated stock solutions need a bit of extra care. Both developer and stop may cause mild burns or dermatitis, and used fix contains metallic silver and should be handled as toxic. The other stuff might have some environmental concerns, so check with local regulations about disposal, and use common sense when handling.
     
  5. BlackSheep

    BlackSheep No longer a newbie, moving up!

    Joined:
    Feb 6, 2011
    Messages:
    1,576
    Likes Received:
    228
    Location:
    Woodbridge, Canada
    Can others edit my Photos:
    Photos OK to edit
    For any chemical (darkroom or otherwise), you can look up the Material Safety Data Sheet (MSDS) online, usually right on the manufacturer's website. These sheets include information on what the active ingredients are, how it can affect you (i.e. if you swallow some, or if it contacts your skin, etc., etc.) and first aid info. So, for example - here is the link to the available MSDS's on Kodak D-76:

    Search Results

    The best part about using the MSDS's is that they are specific to the product you are using, so there's no second-guessing about concentrations and that sort of stuff.

    The MSDS's are available for pretty much anything, at least here in Canada - even for Windex and deodorant room sprays!
     
  6. edcculus

    edcculus TPF Noob!

    Joined:
    Feb 23, 2012
    Messages:
    3
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    Greenville, SC
    Can others edit my Photos:
    Photos NOT OK to edit
    I was going to mention this, and I'm glad you did. I think this should be put on the first post rather than here at the end. If you want to know about any chemical, look up the MSDS. I work in printing, and we have to have an MSDS sheet for any ink, coating, varnish, chemical, plate developer etc that comes in the building.

    If you can't find the MSDS online, contact the manufacturer, and they can send you one.
     
  7. jeremyh1988

    jeremyh1988 TPF Noob!

    Joined:
    Jan 31, 2013
    Messages:
    10
    Likes Received:
    0
    Are vinyl gloves alright
     
  8. unpopular

    unpopular Been spending a lot of time on here!

    Joined:
    May 17, 2011
    Messages:
    9,424
    Likes Received:
    1,972
    Location:
    Montana
    Kitchen marigolds were always available to us in school. If anything, household chemicals are going to be more reactive and corrosive. The issue with darkroom chemistry is long-term exposure.
     
  9. jeremyh1988

    jeremyh1988 TPF Noob!

    Joined:
    Jan 31, 2013
    Messages:
    10
    Likes Received:
    0
    Not sure what a "kitchen marigold" is.
     
  10. unpopular

    unpopular Been spending a lot of time on here!

    Joined:
    May 17, 2011
    Messages:
    9,424
    Likes Received:
    1,972
    Location:
    Montana
  11. vintagesnaps

    vintagesnaps Been spending a lot of time on here!

    Joined:
    Jan 13, 2013
    Messages:
    6,275
    Likes Received:
    1,825
    Location:
    US
    Can others edit my Photos:
    Photos NOT OK to edit
    I've used those (but never heard them called that). Sounds like gardening gloves! lol

    Those are what I was taught to use; I don't know about those vinyl gloves.
     
  12. Derrel

    Derrel Mr. Rain Cloud

    Joined:
    Jul 23, 2009
    Messages:
    40,024
    Likes Received:
    15,012
    Location:
    USA
    Can others edit my Photos:
    Photos OK to edit



    zombie_Canon for eternity.jpg
     

Share This Page