Indoor Portrait Question

Discussion in 'Beyond the Basics' started by shutterm, Oct 20, 2009.

  1. shutterm

    shutterm TPF Noob!

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    Hi there... I am normally a natural light outdoor photographer, but have been getting requests for indoor on-location portraits. I'm looking for a *simple* and inexpensive way to do some indoor portraits without having to lug around a ton of stuff. Plus I'll be photographing children and don't want a ton of equipment to make it feel to "stiff" -- I want it to be as informal and relaxed as possible.

    I have a Canon DSLR and the Speedlite 580 flash that I've been using on camera (hotshoe mount), so I was considering getting a large reflector and stand, and bouncing the flash off of that for some nice side lighting.

    Any thoughts on that approach or recommendations? Thanks in advance!!!
     
  2. WimFoto

    WimFoto TPF Noob!

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    a large reflector and stand are probably a good idea. if you are new at it why not rent some basics first? the people at the store can likely recommend what you need and that way you get to try out this portrait thing, see if it is for you before you invest in equipment.

    wim
     
  3. Derrel

    Derrel Mr. Rain Cloud

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    Sure, a 45 inch to 60 inch umbrella and speedlight will work,especially is paired with a large reflector, something in the 48x72 inch size actually being large enough to do some actual good. It might take a bit of practice to learn how high to position the light.

    I still think that for a lighting beginner, that a AC-powered monolight, with a modeling light in it, helps to literally see the shadows,and the catchlights, and to literally see if the reflector is positioned correctly. A lot of beginners tend to position their reflector in the wrong spot. Adorama sells its own line of Flashpoint monolights, and a 150-watt-second model is $99, and #129 with a 10 foot light stand and simple umbrella. That would allow you to use your 580 at half power while shoe-mounted, for neutral,on-axis fill lighting.
     
  4. shutterm

    shutterm TPF Noob!

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    Thanks everyone for your replies... this helps a ton!

    I've also been considering just using an on-camera flash bounce/diffuser (either the Gary Fong Lightsphere or A Better Bounce Card).

    The reason being is that if I'm doing family portraits with kids, then kids tend to bounce around a lot. I'd like them to be able to move around and not be restricted to a specific spot (in order to get the reflection right, they'd have to sit in a specific place...).

    Any thoughts on that too? Thanks!
     
  5. MACollum

    MACollum TPF Noob!

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    I love my Lightsphere. I never use the flash without it. Of course, I don't have an off-camera setup yet. If you can handle your camera one-handed, you can hold a reflector to bounce off of.
     

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