Infrared is FUN!

Discussion in 'Alternative Techniques & Photo Gallery' started by Double H, Nov 21, 2007.

  1. Double H

    Double H TPF Noob!

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  2. doobs

    doobs TPF Noob!

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    Great job! HIE?
     
  3. Double H

    Double H TPF Noob!

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    No, but thanks! These were shot with a Fuji S2 Pro + a Hoya R72 IR filter on a Nikkor lens
     
  4. cameramike

    cameramike TPF Noob!

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    awesome shots!
     
  5. itsallinphilly5515

    itsallinphilly5515 TPF Noob!

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    Can you please explain how infrared is done? Please and thank you
     
  6. doobs

    doobs TPF Noob!

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    You get infrared film and a red filter and shoot!
     
  7. nealjpage

    nealjpage multi format master in a film geek package

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    I haven't shot any, either, but try searching the forums a bit. There's a lot of info out there. I know Terri and a few others get into it. They'll help you out.
     
  8. terri

    terri Administrator Staff Member Supporting Member

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    Well, my favorite IR film is Kodak HIE which is being D/C next month - it's still easy to find, but I'm not certain this was an analog question. ;) The OP uses digital and that's a foreign language to me. This thread is actually mis-posted, since the Alt Forum is geared towards film-based photography; I just let it slide.
     
  9. doobs

    doobs TPF Noob!

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    You can do digital IR?
     
  10. terri

    terri Administrator Staff Member Supporting Member

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    So they say. :mrgreen: I believe that is what is posted in this thread.
     
  11. doobs

    doobs TPF Noob!

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    You know, I just googled this and tried it and if you point a remote at your camera and press a button on the remote, and see a white flashing light you can take infrared pictures. So I grabbed an infrared filter and tried it, but when I converted to B+W in PS, it didn't work. :/
     
  12. Helen B

    Helen B TPF Noob!

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    Doobs,

    It's easier using digital, in may ways. Sensors are inherently sensitive to infrared, and it is usually a nuisance rather than a benefit. The RGB filters mostly pass infrared - even the green and blue ones - so there needs to be another filter over the sensor to stop the infrared radiation but allow the light to pass.

    This is not easy to do perfectly at all angles of incidence, so some infrared may get through. It varies from camera to camera. It's rather like light meters - many of them read infrared radiation to some extent, as well as the light that they are meant to read.

    Sony 'Nightshot' video cameras allow the filter to be moved out of the way, so that when Nightshot is engaged the filter is out of the way, and infrared sources ("black lights") can be used. The Nightswitch mode also forces the camera to maximum exposure, to deter the use of it during the day - not all clothing is opaque to infrared, and Sony do not like being associated with a device that can 'see through' clothing.

    As you have already discovered, some cameras can be used for infrared without modification. You can also have the infrared-reducing filter removed from the sensor, or you can buy a camera with no filter there in the first place - such as the Fuji IS-1. The IS-1 has an electronic viewfinder - which is a useful feature for an infrared camera.

    The sensitivity of sensors to infrared has a small downside for colour work. Colour infrared film is only sensitive to infrared in the blue-sensitive layer. Therefore if you cut blue light with a yellow filter the film then has layers sensitive to green, red and infrared. The false colour can then be created from these three (green becomes blue; red becomes green; infrared becomes red). This is not so straightforward with digital, but it can be done.

    Best,
    Helen
     

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