Infrared photography help?

Discussion in 'Beyond the Basics' started by placeonthecorner, Jan 28, 2007.

  1. placeonthecorner

    placeonthecorner TPF Noob!

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    hi all... just wondering, ive seen alot of infrared filters around ebay, and i was wondering how they work?... do i need to use them with infrared film?... im using a minolta x-570... thanx:hugs:
     
  2. Sw1tchFX

    Sw1tchFX TPF Noob!

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    I've heard IR film is really tricky, it's much easier and MUCH cleaner to do it digitally. I really don't know if you need IR filters for film like you do with digital.
     
  3. Alpha

    Alpha Troll Extraordinaire

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    I'm gonna pretend like you didn't say anything was easier with digital.

    Anyway, IR photography is not hard. Go buy some IR film. These would be Kodak HIE, Maco IR, or soon-to-be-back Ilford SFX. Buy a red filter. They come in different darknesses. You can check film specs on the film manufacturer sites, and they'll make recommendations for filter types. Either the film box itself or the filter manufacturer will tell you how many stops you need to compensate because of the filter. Load the film in the dark, go out with your camera and set up. Either zone meter or you can try metering through-lens if you didn't buy a really dark filter. You could also meter without the filter, then put the filter on and adjust the exposure time/aperture. You should probably adjust/compensate the focus by following the red lines on your lens. They're there for your benefit, b/c infrared light focuses slightly differently than most visible wavelengths. This isn't so necessary if you've got an APO lens. Take your shot. Then bracket the exposure a lot and take notes. Develop the film and see which shot turned out the best. Remember the settings. Now you're set to take IR shots whenever, wherever.

    And about the digital thing, that's complete bull. All the steps are the same except for the loading the film part. Oh, and you have to pull the covering off your sensor, which apparently makes it relatively useless for normal photos. Oh, and you have to screw around with post processing for god knows how long. Digital infrared is like building a kit car.
     
  4. Digital Matt

    Digital Matt alter ego: Analog Matt

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    Good advice on IR film, but you obviously don't know much about digital IR. I would hesitate to call it complete bull. You don't have to pull the "covering" off your sensor, and you don't have to screw around with post processing for god knows how long. Like anything photography related, you have to know what you are doing, and once you do, it is easy, and enjoyable.
     
  5. Alpha

    Alpha Troll Extraordinaire

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    Okay you still have to worry about filters, metering, exposure compensation, etc. And your RAW shot will not look like an IR shot, hence, the post-processing.

    I just think it's silly that people insist everything digital is "easier." Not really. I think it's much easier to just load up some film and nail the shot than it is to play around with PS just to get it looking the way you want.
     
  6. Digital Matt

    Digital Matt alter ego: Analog Matt

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    I don't know why you have to worry about filters, as if when shooting film you never use such a thing. Exposure compensation? You have to expose the medium properly, the same way you would any other photographic medium. The fact that it takes a long exposure is just par for the course. IR film has no rated ISO, so it has its own intricacies. If all you like to do is load up some film, "nail" the shot, and drop it off to your lab to "nail" the processing for you, then digital infrared is not for you. If you know what you are doing, you don't have to "play" around in PS to get it to look the way you want, any more than you have to play around in the darkroom to make a print.
     
  7. placeonthecorner

    placeonthecorner TPF Noob!

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    alot of good advice there thanx!!.... so is sfx coming back?... happy days!!:D
     
  8. Alpha

    Alpha Troll Extraordinaire

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    From Simon Galley @ Ilford:

    "We are pleased to announce that the product will be relaunched Worldwide during March 2007 in 135 - 36 exp cassettes and in the 120 format, in addition a special pack containing 3 x ILFORD SFX 200 135 - 36 and a COKIN "P" SFX filter will be made available. ILFORD SFX 200 will become a ‘MOD’ MANUFACTURE ON DEMAND item, where the film is manufactured on an approximately annual basis to ensure the highest quality of manufacture."
     
  9. lmelanie

    lmelanie TPF Noob!

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    i wanted to use color infrared film..what is the process on that? do i need a filter and how does it process?
     
  10. placeonthecorner

    placeonthecorner TPF Noob!

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    GET IN!!!! i cant wait!:hail:
     
  11. Sw1tchFX

    Sw1tchFX TPF Noob!

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    Digital IR really IS easy in comparison to film. As long as you have someone modify your camera, you don't have to wait for astronomicly long exposures, you don't need filters, you can just use the LCD to check your exposures, and since it's not film, you don't have to worry about getting foggy results.
     

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