Infrared Photography

Discussion in 'Beyond the Basics' started by journeyman, Jun 27, 2006.

  1. journeyman

    journeyman TPF Noob!

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    I know very little on the subject but I did want to ask. What are the pro's and con's between infrared films or an infrared filter?

    Any info you have on the subject would be fascinating to hear.
     
  2. Digital Matt

    Digital Matt alter ego: Analog Matt

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    Infrared filters are used mostly with digital cameras, to block most of the visible light. With infrared film, you need only a #25 red filter to block some of the blue/cyan tones in the visible spectrum, and isolate the infrared spectrum. I can tell you alot about digital infrared, and I'm sure some others will be along to fill you in on infrared film.
     
  3. markc

    markc TPF Noob!

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    Though if you use a filter that cuts off further into the IR, you get more of an IR effect, since no visible light would be recorded. 'Course that's based on data and not personal experience. You'd probably need longer exposures, though.
     
  4. DIRT

    DIRT TPF Noob!

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    IR is awesome, I love it. The film is more $$$ though.
     
  5. fightheheathens

    fightheheathens TPF Noob!

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    IR film is expensive and many labs wont processes it.
    i've worked with B&W IR film before and the results were really cool, but i also developed my own. I think you probably get more "accurate" results with IR film, but its expensive (think 15 for 36 exposure roll) and its hard to process right.
    however, if i had more money i would do Film IR more often.
     

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