interested in purchasing a first camera

Discussion in 'Photography Beginners' Forum' started by buddyguy, Mar 11, 2009.

  1. buddyguy

    buddyguy TPF Noob!

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    Every day as I walk down the street I am blown away by all the things I see that I want to capture on film and share. I don't have a camera however and really know nothing about photography. I want to buy a good starting camera that will take quality pictures and leave me plenty of room to develop(personally, not film) as a photographer. Price IS an object but since I don't really know what a good camera costs feel free to suggest cameras in a variety of price ranges, but please think in terms of bang/buck ratio. Please explain to me why each suggestion would be good for me and worht its price.

    Thank you very much.
     
  2. nikonguy

    nikonguy TPF Noob!

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    it would be really helpful if we could maybe know your max budget.. because if its 100 bucks, then we can tell you what you can get for that, but if its 1000 bucks then we can give you more options.. whats your max?
     
  3. TheOtherBob

    TheOtherBob TPF Noob!

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    +1.

    It also depends on whether you're interested in point and shoots or an SLR setup. You might start by looking at BHphotovideo.com -- just go over to "digital cameras," sort by price so that you can look in your price range, and get some idea of what's out there and what it costs. After that, it's a matter of sorting out what you want to do with the camera, what kinds of pictures you think you'll like to take, etc. -- I think we need more information about that to make a good recommendation.

    Nonetheless, I'll hazard a guess at what might work for you -- if you're looking for a camera that you can always keep on your person as you walk around, you're probably looking for something very compact. But you're also looking for something with manual controls that will let you grow and learn. So how about the Canon G10? (Is that in your price range?)
     
  4. buddyguy

    buddyguy TPF Noob!

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    Sorry if i wasn't clear enough, I think I just don't speak your language yet.

    First off on the budget, I don't know what my money buys when it comes to cameras, so lets say I top out at 500 but I would prefer to spend less and wouldn't be opposed to people arguing that I should spend more.

    Second off What I meant by room to develop as a photographer is that I want learn a lot about photography and become proficient in the technical use of a camera to get the photograph I want. I want to take high quality photographs. On the other hand I, who have no background whatsoever in photography, want to have a reasonable idea of how to use my camera from day one.

    Third, it is not a requirement that the camera has to be particularily carryable, however carryability is not something I consider bad.
     
  5. buddyguy

    buddyguy TPF Noob!

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    The canon g10 seems believeable as something I would want. Can you please explain to me the difference with manual controls vs point and shoot vs. SLR (which I don't know what it means)? I feel that I want more than a simple point and shoot but I don't really know anything about cameras yet.
     
  6. Katier

    Katier TPF Noob!

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    SLR = Single-lens reflex camera - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

    Manual Controls allow a lot more control over the camera. 100% automatic modes just take a best guess at the shot but, while it can get the exposure right, there's plenty of times it doesn't. Plus for more complicated shots or shots involving additional light manual control is often essential.

    Ultimatly you probably will want the flexibility of a SLR, but initially something like the G10 is a good starting point. The most important thing is you understand 'Exposure' and for that Bryan Peterson's 'Understanding Exposure' might be a good starting point.

    For carryablity Point and Shoots/compact digitals are the lightest but have limitations although initially, especially with something like the G10 you may not reach them. SLR's can get a bit more bulky but it depends on the setup it's quite possible to get them down to quite compact dimensions (although never down to compact dimensions ). But even so they're still eminantly carryable.

    Personally if I was you I'd read up a bit, understand exposure and how photography works, understand what the different camera types are and then come back with a more solid idea of your aims.
     
  7. nikonguy

    nikonguy TPF Noob!

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    if your looking for a point and shoot, with a budget of 500, something like the nikon p6000 or the canon g10 would be great cameras
     
  8. Torus34

    Torus34 No longer a newbie, moving up!

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    Please don't forget, when considering the cost of a digital camera, to include the cost of a spare battery [some rigs use specific expensive batteries, not the everlovin' AA's,] and a spare chip or two [many cameras come with a chip with very, very limited capacity.]

    Meanwhile while researching, you can still have a great time with a simple disposable camera. It will give you a fine start in training your 'eye'.
     
  9. Village Idiot

    Village Idiot No longer a newbie, moving up!

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    If a person is really interested in photography, it's pointless to buy a $400 advanced P&S then sell it at a loss and then buy an entry level SLR that they could have bought in the first place without losing money.

    Anything will work. You can find Canon 20D bodies for $300ish used, iirc. 30D's for $400, 40D's for $600 (These are not entry level, but much better bang for your buck).

    I think some one said there were refurbed Nikon d40's going for $259.

    Any camera body will do, it's what you do that matters. There's a lot to learn and that will be the most critical thing. Don't expect to pick up a camera and be able to churn out Pulitzer photos. Eventually if you're into it and you want to learn what to do, then you'll get good, but it's not something that happens over night.
     
  10. anubis404

    anubis404 TPF Noob!

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    500 is a good budget. Do NOT go with a P&S, 500 can get you a decent slr setup. I would recommend a D70 or D70s with its kit lens. This camera comes with one of the greatest kit lenses around (the 18-70), and its very sharp and costs very little. The D70 is going for around $250-300 nowdays. Maybe $350 with the kit. Look for a used one on ebay or an online camera store. Use the extra money to get a 50mm F1.8 lens. Its a great starter setup.
     
  11. Dao

    Dao No longer a newbie, moving up!

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    You may want to see how those cameras looks like. Is it something you like to carry around? Especially with the DSLR/SLR type setup, sometimes you may need to carry few lenses with you.

    Go to dpreview.com and check out their review on cameras. Used photo equipments are also a choice. Couple weeks ago, I pick up a used (like new) Nikon D50 with the kit lens (and a camera bag) for less than $250. And that camera had only be "clicked" for a little over 2000 times. (I picked that up for a friend want to get a cheap DLSR and he was looking at the new D40)

    So if you are tight in budget, you can start off cheap by looking at the used gears market. Of course, since you do not know too much about camera stuff, it maybe tough unless someone you know that he/she is into photography stuff can help you.
     
  12. Katier

    Katier TPF Noob!

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    "Any camera body will do, it's what you do that matters. There's a lot to learn and that will be the most critical thing. Don't expect to pick up a camera and be able to churn out Pulitzer photos. Eventually if you're into it and you want to learn what to do, then you'll get good, but it's not something that happens over night."

    Very true.

    As has been said $500 will get you a good DSLR on the second hand market. I'd steer away from D40/D60 Nikon Suggestions.

    The Canon suggestions aren't bad at all, Pentax is my favourite manufacturer and if you shop around you can definatly get a K100D well inside your budget and almost certainly the better ( and very good ) K10D - both second hand. New if you shop around you might get the K200D or the lighter, slightly less capable K-m ( although I personally don't like the K-m due to it's lacking a top LCD).
     

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