Interesting model situation - how would you handle it?

Discussion in 'Beyond the Basics' started by DocFrankenstein, Nov 7, 2006.

  1. DocFrankenstein

    DocFrankenstein Clinically Insane?

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    You will be shooting some models, but will have minimal time to work with each, since they'll be running off to the runway in seconds.

    You do not have any control of the clothes, colors, makeup... anything.


    You have 2 strobes and a couple of reflectors.

    What light setup do you use?

    Thanks
     
  2. Digital Matt

    Digital Matt alter ego: Analog Matt

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    I don't know where you'll be shooting them, but if there is a white wall or something, I'd use 1 background light to light the wall, (metered to 3-4 stops over the key), 1 strobe on the right, and a reflector on the left. Setup a 1:2 ratio. Once setup, you can easily move them into position and fire off a shot. Have the camera tripod mounted, so you can focus and shoot.
     
  3. W.Smith

    W.Smith TPF Noob!

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    Concur.
    And – obviously – do test shots beforehand so that everything is entirely ready when the show starts.

    But, Matt, why the cam on tripod? Flash freezes (most) motion anyway, so, imho, that shouldn't be neccessary.
     
  4. Digital Matt

    Digital Matt alter ego: Analog Matt

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    So the composition is set. I'm getting the feeling that these would be head and shoulder shots. If you tripod the cam, you have your composition the same for everyone and you don't have to worry about setting the camera down between shots. I think it just makes you ready for every shot, which he might need with limited time between shots.
     
  5. W.Smith

    W.Smith TPF Noob!

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    He said 'runway', so I'm assuming a fashion show. In most of those full figures are important. Unless, of course, it's 'only' a hat or jewelry show.
    A fashion show is 'unstoppable' once it gets going. He wouldn't have time to put down his camera anyway.
    True. And he could even just stand there – not looking through the viewfinder for every single shot – then ask the model to "strike the pose" and simply push the button.
    "Assembly line" work, really.
     
  6. DocFrankenstein

    DocFrankenstein Clinically Insane?

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    I have total creative freedom and can shoot anything and everything. I'm limited by the size of the backdrop only. I don't know yet how big of a backdrop I'll be able to put there.

    I'd prefer softboxes and more lights... I think.

    I'll put a tripod to be able to keep the position. :mrgreen:

    It is a clothes fashion show, but I wanna get both full figure and headshots from it.

    Do you think I should try to get just one framing or a few? IE would it make sense to do both headshots and full body, or is spreading myself too thin?
     
  7. zx3guy2000

    zx3guy2000 TPF Noob!

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    Hmm... if you have 2 camera's you can put one on the tripod (like suggested) with a remote trigger for shooting the full body shots, (not sure if it will focus before shooting - never used one before) and have the second around your neck to shoot the headshots. In doing this you should be able to make the shots in the limited time, and the model will be able to head to the runway!!
     

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