IR on a DSLR

Discussion in 'Beyond the Basics' started by McQueen278, Mar 25, 2008.

  1. McQueen278

    McQueen278 TPF Noob!

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    I would like to start playing with infra red filters, but I know nothing about IR photography. Advice? Instructions? Anyone make better filters than Cokin for IR?
     
  2. MX962

    MX962 TPF Noob!

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    B/W makes a decent one ,there fairly expensive and slow but they work,I'll be in the process of converting my 10D to IR this year "I hope" so no filters needed
     
  3. Garbz

    Garbz No longer a newbie, moving up!

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    Hoya's RM75 and RM90 filters are a leap and bound above their cheap UV and polarisers. I have an RM75 myself.

    I get decent photos out of my D200 which means you can get decent photos from any DSLR since the D200 is one of the worst for it. The cost isn't great I suggest you just buy the filter and give it a go. If you don't like it I am sure that people on ebay would be very willing to take it off your hands.
     
  4. shorty6049

    shorty6049 TPF Noob!

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    The most popular filter for IR phtography is the Hoya R72 filter. The best suggestion, would be to just buy the filter (ebay will probably be cheapest) and play around with it. Just buy it for whatever lens you'll be using it with, so something wide is usually preferrable, but it depends on what you plan to shoot. Then just try it out, and see what you get for results. The best thing to do is just buy it, then learn how to use it once you actually have it and know how your camera performs with infrared light and everything. what kind of camera are you using by the way?
     
  5. shorty6049

    shorty6049 TPF Noob!

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    are those UV filters? McQueen278 is looking for IR
     
  6. Garbz

    Garbz No longer a newbie, moving up!

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    The second one is. The first filter I made up :er:

    Ok so correction to the above the first filter is the R72 a Hoya High Pass filter which kicks in at 720nm. The second IS an IR filter. The more expensive Hoya RM90 kicks in at 900nm and gives an even more IR type effect and is even harder to use with a non-IR specific digital camera.
     
  7. McQueen278

    McQueen278 TPF Noob!

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    I use a 40D mostly, but i also have an Olympus E1 if either one would work better.
     
  8. McQueen278

    McQueen278 TPF Noob!

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    Do you think it would be best to use my 10-22mm or my 50mm prime? I'm thinking the prime has a larger max aperture and will be sharper, but the 10-22 will produce much more dramatic pictures. Thoughts?
     
  9. Garbz

    Garbz No longer a newbie, moving up!

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    My thought is that these filters are expensive so you don't have a lens with a wider zoom range?

    The 50mm filter would be cheaper having a 52mm thread on the front (f/1.8 I assume). The 10-22 has a much larger one I would say?

    This is something you can test yourself. I like IR for landscapes (remember moving subjects are near impossible without a converted / film camera) so it is really up to your style of shooting.
     
  10. McQueen278

    McQueen278 TPF Noob!

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    yeah I've got a 28-135 IS USM, but I'd rather go really wide or use my 50mm F1.8. I think I'm going to try the 10-22. It will just be a lot more fun.

    and yes, the 10-22mm has a 77mm filter size, which the least expensive filter I've found has been $60 and 720nm whereas the 50mm has a 52mm filter size and only cost $30.
     

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