Is a 50mm too far from normal for a 30D?

Discussion in 'Beyond the Basics' started by Mihai, Aug 9, 2006.

  1. Mihai

    Mihai TPF Noob!

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    Hi there,

    my first post, so please don't hit hard :).

    I plan to buy a Canon 30D + a Canon 50mm f/1.4 USM as my first SLR system (other lenses will come in time as needed). This is basically following the advice of Philip Greenspun but adapted after I held a Rebel in my hand and decided not to buy any EF-S lenses (for forward compatibility with future full-sensor digital SLRs). When I say future, I don't mean next year. I mean 5 -10 years from now.

    My first question is: will the 50mm be too tele to be useful as a general purpose lens on a 30D, or "will do"?

    The second question - any flaw in my plan? I've been considering Nikon's D200 and the D80 as alternatives and I have a hard time deciding, although I like Canon's opening toward full sensors.

    Thanks for any advice you have,
    Mihai
     
  2. duncanp

    duncanp TPF Noob!

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    sigma do a 30mm f3.8 which bringd you back round to more normal, byt i dont really think a 50mm with tthe cropping factor isnt too telephoto
     
  3. Torus34

    Torus34 No longer a newbie, moving up!

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    Welcome!

    First, this Forum really frowns big time on those who 'hit hard.' If you check the rules, you'll see what I mean.

    Your choice of a Canon 30D means you will be making a very substantial purchase. The 50mm is an excellent lens. It might be a bit too narrow for landscape work, though. There's an easy fix. For about $US150, you can add the 18-55mm EF-S lens. This will take care of your shorter fl needs while you recover financially. While it will not go down in history as the greatest glass ever, it will provide you with lots of good images until you're ready to trade it in on a high-quality replacement.
     
  4. ShutteredEye

    ShutteredEye TPF Noob!

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    The 50 is an excellent lense, both the 1.4, and the 1.8. It's a great lense to get to know your camera with too. I say go for it!
     
  5. Big Mike

    Big Mike I am Big, I am Mike Staff Member Supporting Member

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    I agree completely with Torus34. The kit lens EF-S 18-55 would be a good option. I understand that you don't want to invest in EF-S glass...but if you get 5-10 years of use for $150...I'd say that's money well spent.

    You have probably read that the EF-S 18-55 lens is crap. It seams that everyone on the Internet is saying that. I own that lens and I don't think it's all that bad (especially for the price). The worst part is that it 'feels' so cheap because it's so light. It certainly isn't the best quality lens I own, but it gets a lot of use because of it's wide view.

    On my film EOS, I loved my 50mm lens. I still love it on my 20D but I do find it too long, especially indoors. Maybe consider a 24mm, a 28mm or a 35mm.
     
  6. Mihai

    Mihai TPF Noob!

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    Thanks a lot guys!

    Duncanp, I agree with you that a 35mm is a better choice for a first lens. However, at f/3.5 its way too slow for my purpose. I plan to use this first lens primarily to shoot my kids indoors and as a high quality first lens, mainly to learn to use the camera without having to think about zoom (and have the freedom to go to high speed at large apertures). Of course, a 35mm f/1.4 would be the best choice, but I don't know of any that are full size (not EF-S).

    Regarding the zoom kit lens, besides the fact that is an EF-S, what worries me most is that it's slow and doesn't have USM. How big of a deal is this USM thing? However, I will consider it as something to bridge the gap until I get a better lens in that range.

    However, what I hear from you all (except from ShutteredEye), is that with a 50mm I WILL feel limited by the narrow field of view (and hence need the wide angle kit lens).

    Perhaps a 28mm would be a better option than a 50mm (given that there is no decent 35mm). Any suggestions?

    Thanks guys,
    Mihai
     
  7. Big Mike

    Big Mike I am Big, I am Mike Staff Member Supporting Member

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    Canon makes an EF 35mm F1.4 L USM & an EF 35mm F2 (both OK for full sensor).

    Check their line-up here
     
  8. AdriBella

    AdriBella TPF Noob!

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    I'm a nikon loyal myself. So as I cannot speak from experience on Canon; I LOVE my Nikon 50mm f/1.8. At $100 it was a steal for the quality. It is great for portraits BUT if you plan on using it indoors you really need to have a lot of space indoors. I use my 50mm outside as I cannot get a good enough distance when inside. HTH. I would invest in the 50mm (you will be gld you did ;)) AND maybe a kit lens to hold you over until more funds are available.
     
  9. Mihai

    Mihai TPF Noob!

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    Mike, those two lenses are too... extreme :). I mean the L is $1200 and the 35/2 doesn't have USM and is slow. I'm looking at Canon EF 28/1.8 USM as a better alternative (for my budget and wishes).

    Or get the 50, get frustrated indoors, eat rice for two months and get
    a wide-lens zoom.

    M.
     
  10. ShutteredEye

    ShutteredEye TPF Noob!

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    I have both a 50mm 1.8 and 24mm 2.8. The 50 is on my camera 95% of the time.

    It's not too narrow, you just have to work for your shots. And just try taking portraits with a 28mm....
     
  11. Mihai

    Mihai TPF Noob!

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    I can work. I love work. I used to work a lot when I had a good all manual fixed lens a long time ago and I loved it. I want to get back in working mode.

    I think that I'll go with the 50mm and if I absolutely can't live with it I'll also get a wide angle (zoom).

    Thanks a lot,
    Mihai
     
  12. Big Mike

    Big Mike I am Big, I am Mike Staff Member Supporting Member

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    It depends what you are shooting. Yes, 24mm is too wide for portraits (too much distortion) but 50mm can be a pain on a crop factor camera. Although, for the price of a 50mm F1.8...no EOS owner should be without one.

    The 28mm F1.8 USM is probably a great fit.
     

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