ISO, Shutter, F-stop ???

Discussion in 'Photography Beginners' Forum' started by protos, Feb 26, 2009.

  1. protos

    protos TPF Noob!

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    Hi everyone, I'm basically new (again) to photography & am having trouble dealing with film speed, aperture, and f-stop settings on my ancient 35mm Minolta XE-7. Here's two starter questions:

    1) If I am using ISO 100 BW photo print film in bright sunlight at F16, then my shutter speed can not be set at less than 1/125 unless I'm using a tripod?

    2) If I want to change the f-stop to say, 5.6, to decrease the DOF, do I have to set the shutter speed to the last available speed of 1000 in order to get the exposure correct?

    If it helps, my subjects are stationary and I'm using only with 28mm and 55mm lenses for now.

    I would really appreciate any help in understanding the application of these give/get principles when it comes to exposure.
     
  2. Overread

    Overread has a hat around here somewhere Staff Member Supporting Member

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    I would strongly recomend getting and reading the book
    "Understanding Exposure" by Bryan Peterson. It will help you a alot in understanding how the three relate together.

    I don't understand enough myself about the numbers to be able to fully answer the questions you are asking but:

    1) shutter speeds should be at least 1/60 or faster in order to avoid handshake - however also bare in mind that the guide slowest shooting speed for a lens is 1/lens focal length. So if your shooting with a 300mm lens your (ideal) slowest shutter speed would be 1/300sec.
    If you have stactic subjects though then get the tripod out anyway - it does help

    2) you would use the camera meter or an external light meter to work out the shutter speed needed, If you camera has a built in meter then there should be a section in the manual about using it. If not then search for your camera's manufacturer website and chances are they have manuals for download there
     
  3. jordan!

    jordan! TPF Noob!

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    I think what you're talking about is the sunny 16 rule, so yeah, generally with ISO 100 film and f/16, 1/125 is going to be pretty close to the correct exposure. Assuming f/16, 1/125 was the correct exposure, f/5.6, 1/1000 would also be correct, I believe.

    Like Overread said, you should definitely check out Understanding Exposure, it's a good read.
     
  4. LarryD

    LarryD TPF Noob!

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    Your math is correct Protos...

    But most of the time, we would still bracket to ensure at least one shot was exposed right... and it's really only a basic estimate in lieu of a good meter.

    As far as a tripod at slower than 1/125, that has nothing to do with the exposure settings, it has to do with how steady you can hold the camera.. If you desire to go to 1/60 (or slower), then you would have to stop down to f-22..etc, however many older lenses only go down to f-16.

    Black and White has more latitude in the darkroom though...
     
  5. AlexColeman

    AlexColeman TPF Noob!

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    Does it not include a meter?
     
  6. protos

    protos TPF Noob!

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    Thanks everyone! That makes me more comfortable with turning all those dials - usually I feel like I'm just taking shots in the dark (no pun intended). Yes, the camera does have an internal meter & it seems pretty reliable to crosscheck with the math. I will definitely check out that book. Sounds like just what I need.
     

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