ISO's

Discussion in 'Photography Beginners' Forum' started by Bryant, Jul 17, 2008.

  1. Bryant

    Bryant TPF Noob!

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    Could someone please give me a runthrough on the different times to use different iso's. I'm trying to create a little cheat sheet so I can use till I get a handle on everything. I understand that the iso is used to determine how how reactive the film (or the digital) is to light. And I know how the higher the iso, the grainier and more posibility for noise there is. I also know that you are supposed to adjust to adapt to shutter and aperture, but I'd like to know the area.

    I'd just like to know when to use 100 or when to work up to like 800. Like low light, shining light, nighttime, sunset, dark, lights at night.

    THanks in advance.
     
  2. Kstrong

    Kstrong TPF Noob!

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    Pretty much just answered your own question there.

    You'll learn very fast what to set your ISO at, I always try to keep it as low as possible (to avoid grainy pictures). If your shooting a moving subject in a dark area, you'll have to have a higher ISO, since it is more sensitive to light. But if your shotting a still subject (and you have a tripod) you can turn your ISO down and just go with a longer shutter speed.

    Hope that helps/answers your question.
     
  3. manaheim

    manaheim Jedi Bunnywabbit Staff Member Supporting Member

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    mmm... less light=use higher ISO.

    It's kind of a "keep turning up the ISO until you hit a point where your camera is telling you that you can take the picture at the shutter speed and aperature appropriate for the scene".

    Higher ISO=more noise, however, so you want to keep the ISO # as low as you can and still get the shot.
     
  4. Bryant

    Bryant TPF Noob!

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    ok thankss
     
  5. prodigy2k7

    prodigy2k7 No longer a newbie, moving up!

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    Also, doubling of the ISO Ex: 200, 400, 800 will make your shutter speed be able to also double Ex: 1/500, 1/1000, f/2000

    Also, high ISO isnt always used in low light, only when you want a decently fast shutter. If you are taking a night shot of a still subject (a cityscape for example) feel free to lower the ISO as low as it can go.
     
  6. TamiyaGuy

    TamiyaGuy No longer a newbie, moving up!

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    Bear in mind that these are my personal preferences. Yours may differ, and you may wish to change them to your liking.

    ISO 100: The slowest of the slow, but the best quality. Use on a bright/bright overcast day when you want to take landscape photos. ISO 100 can also be used for blurring daytime photos (when mounted on a tripod), for instance, blurring a waterfall.

    ISO 200: Still very good quality, but can give you a little bit more. Use on darker overcast days, or days when you want to use a telephoto lens to zoom in on a subject. Can also be used for certain sports, and is good for tripod-mounted night-time photographs.

    ISO 400: My personal favourite ISO for sports, especially here in dull old England. Gives you a shutter speed of about 1/400 in bright overcast weather, and 1/800 in bright sunny weather at f/5.6 (approximations). Also good for darker overcast weather and when you have a fast-moving subject that never stops.

    ISO 800: Better for bright indoor shots (some outside light coming in) where you don't want to use the flash. Also good for very fast moving sports, as you can get a shutter speed of up to 1/1600 in daylight.

    ISO 1600: Only use this when absolutely necessary. Good when you are desperate for a faster shutter speed (for instance, indoor music concerts). Most of the time you can avoid using this ISO by mounting your camera on a tripod or using the flash, but for the times you can't, it's here.

    Well, that's my opinions on which ISOs to use when. I hope it helped you!
     

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