It's raining...

Discussion in 'Photography Beginners' Forum' started by OregonAmy, Feb 19, 2007.

  1. OregonAmy

    OregonAmy TPF Noob!

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    ... and will be for weeks as spring arrives, I'm sure.

    So what to do? I'm thinking I could go downtown & take pictures of people walking around in the rain... or I could go to a park & take pictures of trees or bushes with raindrops... or...

    I don't know, it all sounds so uninspiring. Does anyone have any ideas of good subjects in the rain? :er:
     
  2. Sw1tchFX

    Sw1tchFX TPF Noob!

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    Oh I know. It's raining right now, but that again it's ALWAYS raining in Seattle.

    I don’t usually go out and shoot in the rain because I don’t have a bag big enough for my gear and it’s not sealed. Downtown Portland has plenty of bums, you can take pictures of them in the rain and make them ultra-depressing. :-|
     
  3. PhotoHeather

    PhotoHeather TPF Noob!

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    Start shooting macro shots of weird stuff in your house. Go to the thrift store and pick up strange objects to photograph ("Happy Meal Toys" in odd positions, unusual metal objects, who knows??) Go to an animal shelter and do some sad animal shots.

    Hope some of these triggered some random ideas...
     
  4. ericande

    ericande TPF Noob!

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    There are covered places to take photos... Burnside skatepark?
     
  5. JIP

    JIP No longer a newbie, moving up!

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    From your avatar it looks like you know the best thing to do on a rainy day.
     
  6. Torus34

    Torus34 No longer a newbie, moving up!

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    Oh, wow!

    There you are, living on the scenic left-hand coast, and noting a problem with stuff to photograph because of rain.

    Every challenge is an opportunity.

    Look at the landscape work on this or any site. Note how many are of fair weather, sunlit scenes. Most!

    You've got a wonderful opportunity to sketch out some personal photographic space here. With but a bit of effort, you can learn all sorts of ways to 'rainproof' your particular rig. And you can learn to see interesting compositions which depend on the rain or on dark or featureless skies for impact.

    It's the old trick of looking at the glass and noting that it's still half full while others see it as already half empty.
     
  7. Groupcaptainbonzo

    Groupcaptainbonzo TPF Noob!

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    Keeping kit dry and safe is always a problem in the rain (I'm English. 2 lungs & 2 Gills). But you can always take up Macro shooting for a few days (Look in draws, cupboards, under stairs, Garden shed.......). Make a small shot studio. Some A2 or bigger white card and a few lights to bounce off it (Strobe /Flash or angle poise, candels,even a torch (painting with light). You can even find new ways to light those empty/ full wine bottles you must have laying around the house/ dust bin.
    How about portraits (Family, friends, pets). Sit them near a north faceing window, and use all that lovely diffused light that will flood through. A white card again or even a mirror just out of shot to act as a reflector...
    Raindrops running down the windows... If you have just polished the car (that is what usually causes rain) the beads of water on the polished bonnet ( Yes bonnet WE invented the language, What you lot have done to it over the last 200 years or so .....).
    Hope that helps a little, and you can get some enjoyment
     
  8. snra786

    snra786 TPF Noob!

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    I'm always paranoid about taking my camera out in the rain. I like to shoot from my car while I'm driving around... Sometimes you see something real interesting.
     
  9. OregonAmy

    OregonAmy TPF Noob!

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    Thanks everyone! I didn't even think about my cats, duh.

    Macro shots are a great idea, and is a technique I do need some practice with. And my car! It needs a bath, and what a great idea to practice with beaded raindrops.

    I may take a trip out to Sauvie Island today & take some farm pictures... maybe a rainbow will come out. Thanks guys - I just needed a little nudge in the right direction!

    And if nothing seems to work out, there's always beer. :D
     
  10. I love the way that wet tarmac and asphalt reflects light. I love puddle reflections.

    Get a rain sleeve, they're cheap and handy.
     
  11. OregonAmy

    OregonAmy TPF Noob!

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    oh, I like the rain sleeve - that will be indispensable here.

    this is becoming an expensive (but thoroughly enjoyable) hobby. :D
     
  12. Torus34

    Torus34 No longer a newbie, moving up!

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    Rainproofing a rig is easy, as long as it's a 35mm 'size' or thereabouts without too huge a 'snout'.

    Think in terms of a large 'zip-lock'(r) bag with a hole in it. Don't cut out a circle -- cut an 'x' in the plastic side of the bag so that the lens hood will just fit. Then insert the rig, bind the flaps to the hood with a rubber band and you're set to go.

    Admittedly, viewfinder/screen visibility is a tad lacking, but the rig is safe from water and the whole thing costs bubkas.
     

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