Jill (my first studio portraits)

Discussion in 'The Professional Gallery' started by Puscas, Oct 12, 2007.

  1. Puscas

    Puscas TPF Noob!

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    I took a portraiture class and ended up working with studio lights for the first time. Loved it. Hope you like my small selection (I took some very bad ones too). The model's name is Jill. thanks for any c&c.

    1.
    [​IMG]

    2. (B/W)
    [​IMG]

    3.
    [​IMG]

    4.
    [​IMG]


    thanks for looking


    pascal
     
  2. Big Mike

    Big Mike I am Big, I am Mike Staff Member Supporting Member

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    The first two (same shot?) is quite dramatic, I like it.

    I really like the lighting you have used in the third one...but the crop seems weird...I'd like to see it with a tighter crop. The last one looks to be slightly out of focus compared to the others.

    A small suggestion, have her tilt her head just slightly toward her closest shoulder. It would make it a more feminine post.
     
  3. Puscas

    Puscas TPF Noob!

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    thanks. yes, they are the same

    all right, I'll give that a try.

    oh man, I think you're right...:meh:

    I'll certainly remember that for a next shoot.
    thanks a lot Mike.





    pascal
     
  4. Garbz

    Garbz No longer a newbie, moving up!

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    Hmmm not a fan at all. Not an error of technique or anything but I personally don't think the lighting suits that particular model. I'm mainly talking about the fast falloff from bright on her forehead to much darker further down. It does work very well with some people though.

    Great lighting technique though especially in the last two. I like the mixture of colours.
     
  5. JimmyJaceyMom

    JimmyJaceyMom TPF Noob!

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    I like the first one in b/w - lovely.
     
  6. Puscas

    Puscas TPF Noob!

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    thanks for pointing that out. Why doesn't it work on her; is it the shape of her head? Being new at this, any tips on how you would have done it?

    thank you JJM




    pascal
     
  7. JubbaKing

    JubbaKing TPF Noob!

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    You lit her short. YOU'RE ALREADY AHEAD AT THE LIGHTING GAME BECAUSE OF THIS! Nice job. I think her hair and skin looks a little hot in some spots. Exposure issue or added contrast, I'm not sure.

    #1 I like the dramatic one light effect. I wish you had closed the shadow to give a Rembrandt pattern but it shapers face nicely. Most women won't like this dramatic look though. It's dark and mysterious. Reserve this more for the guys but still, use sparingly (if you're selling these anyway--if you like it, keep doing it!).


    #3 and #4 have a very specular/shiny feel in the darker parts of her face. I'm guessing you used a silver reflector. I only use a silver reflector if I need A LOT of light. For studio shots, I'd use a white reflector (this gives a softer reflected light that won't give off a specular sheen as much to the face as a silver one will), set up high to gently lift the shadows and not give the feel that a second light was used to give more light to a certain area of the face.
     
  8. Puscas

    Puscas TPF Noob!

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    thanks. When you say 'lit short' you mean the lights are close to her face? I noticed the hot spots too, I'm afraid it happened while adding contrast. Stupid me.

    Well, being from Holland, I hád to try the Rembrandt, right...? :mrgreen: I know I didn't get the perfect triangle, but I still like it. Although people also said it has a Vermeer-look to it (I can't escape my Dutch roots..:D) and I see that too (a little bit). Oh and I'm not selling these. But I do want to explore studio portraiture more, so any help is appreciated.


    I used an umbrella.

    To be honest I didn't vary much in heigth with the fill light, so yes, that might have been a good idea.
    thanks for this!



    pascal
     
  9. Mike Jordan

    Mike Jordan TPF Noob!

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    To me, your light is a bit to harsh for her. Besides the highlights, you are also skimming light across her face, which brings out the texture of her skin more than it should. Although she has good skin, she doesn't have the silky smooth type skin that some women have, so side lighting brings this out more than a little more frontal lighting would do.

    I feel that the main light should be a bit higher as well. You are getting almost no nose shadow that falls below her nose. The shadow on the side of her nose on the first 2 makes her nose look fatter than it really is.

    These are just details and you aren't far off in having pretty good lighting. You did good on the pose and color balance. I think the black and white works real well for her the way you do have the lighting in the first one. It gives more of a dramatic appearance which seems to work with her.

    Mike
     
  10. JubbaKing

    JubbaKing TPF Noob!

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    By short lighting, I mean that the side of the face that's farthest from the camera is lit more than the broad (closer) side of the face.
     
  11. Puscas

    Puscas TPF Noob!

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    Thanks. Would make up have been the answer? Changing the light more sideways (you're talking about the keylight, right?) would have changed the shadows too much imho.

    yeah, like I said, I was going for a Rembrandt, so the nose-shadow should have been even longer. It started out ok, and then I let her change position and I wasn't paying enough attention...so this was the end result. A lesson learned...:meh:

    thanks for the input mike! As far as posing goes (facial expressions): Jill was great and I was too busy with the lights and metering to really work on my directing skills.






    I understand. We off course, talked about broad and short lighting in class, but reading 'lit short'...I get confused easily...:mrgreen:





    pascal
     
  12. Mesoam

    Mesoam TPF Noob!

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    she has stunning lips
     

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