Just a couple boys

Discussion in 'The Professional Gallery' started by nkmaurer, Feb 5, 2008.

  1. nkmaurer

    nkmaurer TPF Noob!

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    Just a couple cute boys I had in the last couple days....still trying to figure out my white/grey splotchy background issues

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  2. RowmyF

    RowmyF TPF Noob!

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    I hope I'm not being harsh, but none of these quite grab me. I guess it's hard with studio photos.

    What kind of cam do you use
     
  3. MichaelT

    MichaelT TPF Noob!

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    Correct me if I'm wrong, but it appears that you are not lighting your background. The catch light in the eyes suggests that you are only using 1 light and that it is way too close to the camera.

    I would suggest you study lighting setups and try something different.
     
  4. .Serenity.

    .Serenity. TPF Noob!

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    I think they are great. I would love to have pictures like that of my boys on the wall. Im sure their mother is very happy with the pictures.
     
  5. Christie Photo

    Christie Photo No longer a newbie, moving up!

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    This is a very nice session. Nice variety of posing and expressions.

    I'm not having any trouble with the backgrounds. And, I do see more than one light here. And the placement of lights seems fine too.

    Good job!

    -Pete
     
  6. nkmaurer

    nkmaurer TPF Noob!

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    yeah, I'm not all that happy with my lighting setup and trying to figure out what I can do different. I have a softbox and umbrella at each corner. I am currently in my parent's basement until me and my fiance find a place. I only have about 10-12ft wide to work with because of a post in the basement. And probably 16-18ft in lenght to work with. So.....not the greatest conditions but am trying to make it work. I did borrow a third light one day from a friend to try and brighten up my white backdrop. To get the light behind the subject it was like a spotlight in the middle of the backdrop.....then when I moved it back I obviously blew out the subject. Don't have enough room on both sides to have a light on both sides. What can I do???? With seniors I could hide the third light behind them but with kids that is obviously not gonna happen. Any suggestions if any of what I just said makes any sense???
     
  7. Sw1tchFX

    Sw1tchFX TPF Noob!

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    If you want a white background, you need a background light.

    You can have the softbox be your key, a reflector or piece of foamcore be your fill, and the umbrella light be your background light 2 stops brighter than the key.

    That will get you white backgrounds.
     
  8. MichaelT

    MichaelT TPF Noob!

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    I would suggest using one light on the ceiling pointed toward the background so it illuminates the background. If you can, let it spill a little light on the back of the subjects head. To make the background a clean white, if your camera is set for f5.6 for the subject, light the background for f11.

    With 18 feet of usable length, try to keep your subject at least 5 feet from the background - 7 or 8 would be better.

    Then put the softbox to the side of the subject, but aim it in front of the face, not at the face, so it washes across. Put a reflector on the opposite side to kick light back on the other side for a fill.

    That should give you nice dimensional lighting with 2 lights.

    If you get a 3rd, use it as a hairlight and dedicate the background light to that use.

    I wouldn't worry about a fill light so long as the reflector is kept close. White foam core or a piece of pink foam insulation with a sliver finish works great and is very inexpensive. There are a lot of times that a softbox and a reflector is all you'll need.

    The balance comes from experimenting with the distance of the softbox and reflector to the subject. I suggest you start with the softbox about 3-4 feet and the reflector at half that distance.

    For kids, get the lights set up first. Then put them on a stool or in a chair and you should get a few nice portraits before they get too antsy.

    Anyway, give it a try and see what you get.
     

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