Just getting into film photography...

Discussion in 'Beyond the Basics' started by Gandalf, Nov 2, 2004.

  1. Gandalf

    Gandalf TPF Noob!

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    So I've decided to get into photography as my new hobby since I've always wanted to take nice pictures of all of the historical spots around my area (Niagara Region, Ontario).

    But anyways, I'm thinking that maybe I should just get a used camera to start off with?

    Or should I go new?

    Either way, what cameras would you guys recommend for someone who's jsut starting to get into photography?
     
  2. ksmattfish

    ksmattfish Now 100% DC - not as cool as I once was, but still

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    I say go used. There are a lot of great cameras available cheap.

    Probably the first thing you need to decide is whether you want an old school, mostly metal, manual focus, manual film advance, mostly mechanical with some electronics model (from the 70s and 80s), or a more modern, mostly plastic, auto focus, auto wind, mostly electronic with some mechanical model (from the late 90s and current). Each is different, each has strengths and weaknesses, each will take fantastic and/or crappy photos; it's more about a personal style.
     
  3. DocFrankenstein

    DocFrankenstein Clinically Insane?

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    Historical spots don't run away from you and unlike digital, where the sensor matters you have the same film no matter what camera you put into it.

    If I were to start, I'd pick a manual camera. Go there, mount it on a tripod... slooowly and deliberately focus... make sure everything is right... re-check... shoot it.

    AF cameras are nice when you shoot live events and you just need that shot.

    Plus... old cameras have quality lenses that are available cheaply. With AF cameras you're gonna need a fortune for a semi decent lens kit.
    With manual, you usually won't have quality zooms awailable, but then you don't seem to need them for historical stuff.
     
  4. Corry

    Corry Flirtacious and Bodacious Supporting Member

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    I'll reccomend the Canon AE-1 Program. It was one of the most popular cameras of the 80's. I've had mine since February...my first SLR...and I love it. And it's not an expensive way to start, out, either...I got mine off of ebay for $60, and it included a 50mm 1.8 lense and a softening filter. It's a very sturdy, easy to use camera. Anyway...that's just my .02, and I'm sure others will come along with their recommendations. Good luck! :)
     
  5. Gandalf

    Gandalf TPF Noob!

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    Well I was just talking to my dad and found out that he has an old Minolta XG-M that I can use! Seems like it's in great shape too.

    There are two lenses:

    Minolta 50mm 1:2

    Makinon 28mm 1:2.8


    I have no idea what these are! And there are so many numbers on them!

    So I think I'll start with this camera; does anyone have any thoughts?

    EDIT: I forgot to mention that there are also two filters (at least I think that's what they are). One was on the 50mm lense and says 1B Skylight and the other, on the 28mm lense, says 1A 52mm lense.
     
  6. Big Mike

    Big Mike I am Big, I am Mike Staff Member Supporting Member

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    I don't know much about that particular camera but if it's in good working order, it should be a great camera to get you started with photography. Good Lenses to start with as well.

    As for the numbers...it's best if you do a little reading so that you can ask more specific questions and figure it out for yourself.

    Look up/search these terms...

    Aperture

    Shutter Speed

    Exposure

    That should give you a basic understanding of what the numbers & dials on the camera mean.
     
  7. Gandalf

    Gandalf TPF Noob!

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    Thanks, after reading through the manual and the FAQ it's really not that hard to use, heh.

    Just glancing at the numbers made it seem a little complicated though.
     

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