just need some help

Discussion in 'Beyond the Basics' started by llewlovesdrift, May 21, 2006.

  1. llewlovesdrift

    llewlovesdrift TPF Noob!

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    hey

    i saw this photo of a waterfall type thing but it used a long exposure so the water was blurred and misty - which looked quite cool. so last week i thought id try the same thing - i used a 8 second shutter speed but after said 8 seconds the picture was just white - i assume from the amount of light let in during those 8 seconds- so what do i have to do to take a photo like this?
     
  2. darich

    darich TPF Noob!

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    You need to increase the f/stop to reduce the size of the aperture and therefore reduce the amount of light getting to the film/sensor.

    For an exposure that length, you'll need a tripod or other support for the camera. A rock, fence post - something that won't move during the exposure.
     
  3. llewlovesdrift

    llewlovesdrift TPF Noob!

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    Thanks buddy - i owe you a happy meal
     
  4. Torus34

    Torus34 No longer a newbie, moving up!

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    8 seconds is a mighty long time. Waterfalls can usually be 'blurred' with speeds of 1/8 to 1 second.

    If possible, choose a low ASA film and a heavily overcast day. That will keep you from running out of aperture settings. An accurate exposure meter and a tripod complete the gear package.

    I'll be doing some of this in the NY Finger Lakes region in a couple of months. Films will be Plus X and Pan F.
     
  5. darich

    darich TPF Noob!

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    Following on from what Torus said, i often feel that an exposure of around 1 second is enough to blur the water nicely but not turn it into milk or mist. Depending on the effect you're looking for

    The exposure in this shot is 1/3 second and i used a tripod.

    [​IMG]
     
  6. benhasajeep

    benhasajeep TPF Noob!

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    Are you using film or digital? Shutter speed and water speed determines how to get the white fast water look. Deppending on the light you may need to go to a lower iso film or setting as well.
     
  7. darich

    darich TPF Noob!

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    As a general rule you should always use the lowest ISO speed available to you no matter what you're shooting - unless you're looking for grain/noise for a specific reason.
     
  8. Philip Weir

    Philip Weir TPF Noob!

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    Another point probably worth mentioning is using ND [neutral density] filters. This will necessitate an increase in exposure [longer shutter speeds]
    Problem fixed. Follow Darich's advice. Philip.
     

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