Just purchased a Circular Polarizer...thoughts on it

Discussion in 'Photography Beginners' Forum' started by hankejp, Sep 13, 2008.

  1. hankejp

    hankejp TPF Noob!

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    I just purchased this Circular polarizer.

    [ame]http://www.amazon.com/Hoya-52MM-Circular-Polarizing-Filter/dp/B00006HOAN[/ame]


    Anyone have any thoughts on it? Will it do the job? My 1st camera item purchased over the internet, so I hope I didn't buy something that isn't going to work. I checked my lens and it is a 52 mm lens, so I should be good on that.

    I appreciate any feedback.

    Thanks
     
  2. Montana

    Montana TPF Noob!

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    Although its the cheapest Hoya I have ever seen, it will likely work. Hopefully image quality doesn't suffer too bad. I have used cheap Tiffens in the past with great results.

    Derrick
     
  3. I would humbly propose that research and due diligence might be even more effective before you purchas a product.
     
  4. tirediron

    tirediron Watch the Birdy! Staff Member Supporting Member

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    It will do the job, however I wouldn't expect outstanding results from it. It appears to be an uncoated filter meaning that it will be more subject to reflections, aberrations etc than a coated one. Remember that a filter when attached is part of the optical process. Putting a five dollar filter on a five hundred dollar lens is false economy.

    With respect to the question of use, a circular polarizer (CPOL) is useful for many outdoor situtations. The most common of course are the dark blue skies and bright white clouds. It's also good for removing reflections from water, windows and other reflective surfaces. It can also be used as a neutral density filter (1 stop) and to reduce contrast.

    To acheive optimum results, (esp for the bluest skies), shoot when the sun is lowest in the sky (early morning or evening) and as close to 90 deg to the axis of your lens as possible. The higher in the sky the sun is and the closer to it you shoot, the less effect you will see.
     
  5. iriairi

    iriairi TPF Noob!

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