Lens for interior room photos..

Discussion in 'Photography Equipment & Products' started by dustin0479, May 17, 2012.

  1. dustin0479
    Offline

    dustin0479 New Member

    Joined:
    Oct 10, 2010
    Messages:
    228
    Likes Received:
    9
    Trophy Points:
    0
    Location:
    Delaware
    Gallery:
    Ratings:
    +9 / 0
    My Photos Are OK to Edit
    I am looking for suggestions on a good lens for taking interior room shots. These are basically for an interior design company, we want the images to make the space feel large while minimizing the fisheye effect.
  2. Compaq
    Offline

    Compaq Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Aug 29, 2010
    Messages:
    3,317
    Likes Received:
    575
    Trophy Points:
    113
    Location:
    Norway
    Gallery:
    Ratings:
    +575 / 0
    My Photos Are OK to Edit
    Well, then an ultra wide angle would be your friend. I have Tokina 11-16/2.8. At 11mm, the smallest place seems pretty roomy, due to its distortion. You would need to correct some of the vertical lines in software afterward, but I think you would need that with all UWA lenses. I've never tried, but heard good things about Sigma 8-16mm. Even wider, though a little slower (aperture wise).

    Maybe 8-16mm is a better range, quite noticeable difference between 8 and 11 mm.
  3. Josh220
    Offline

    Josh220 New Member

    Joined:
    May 23, 2009
    Messages:
    1,729
    Likes Received:
    83
    Trophy Points:
    0
    Location:
    California
    Gallery:
    Ratings:
    +83 / 0
    My Photos Are NOT OK to Edit
    Nikon 14-24.

    Done.


    In all seriousness, you need to worry about distortion. The 14-24 is about as good as it gets in this area. If you cannot afford it, I would look into renting it.
  4. Compaq
    Offline

    Compaq Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Aug 29, 2010
    Messages:
    3,317
    Likes Received:
    575
    Trophy Points:
    113
    Location:
    Norway
    Gallery:
    Ratings:
    +575 / 0
    My Photos Are OK to Edit
    Having shot some indoor shots myself, I'd feel a little limited by 14mm in tight spots on a cropped sensor.
  5. Dao
    Offline

    Dao Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Mar 24, 2008
    Messages:
    5,971
    Likes Received:
    350
    Trophy Points:
    83
    Location:
    St. Louis
    Gallery:
    Ratings:
    +350 / 0
    I suggest you rent a lens and see how wide you need. Get a widest one and see. If the focal length cannot cover the field of view you want, you may need to stitch the photos.


    Take a look at this. (The photographer use a 24mm TS lens and maybe a full frame camera)

    • Like Like x 1
  6. Robin Usagani
    Offline

    Robin Usagani Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Jun 6, 2010
    Messages:
    10,312
    Likes Received:
    2,120
    Trophy Points:
    113
    Location:
    Denver, CO
    Gallery:
    Ratings:
    +2,125 / 0
    My Photos Are OK to Edit
    I was gong to suggest 24mm T/S like Dao. That is what most of the successful architectural photographers use.
  7. DiskoJoe
    Offline

    DiskoJoe New Member

    Joined:
    Mar 24, 2011
    Messages:
    4,548
    Likes Received:
    525
    Trophy Points:
    0
    Location:
    Houston
    Gallery:
    Ratings:
    +525 / 0
    My Photos Are NOT OK to Edit
    For a tilt shift I wuold go with the wider angle models, like the canon 17 or the nikon 16. I had a friend that got the 24 and returned it the next day because it was not wide enough for him. With the 17 from canon you effectively get a 12mm view. Not to shabby for full frame.

    Of course OP you never mentioned what camera you have or that you even have one at all.
  8. thestereoeffect
    Offline

    thestereoeffect New Member

    Joined:
    Nov 12, 2011
    Messages:
    37
    Likes Received:
    2
    Trophy Points:
    0
    Gallery:
    Ratings:
    +2 / 0
    It seems many of the replies assume he is on a FF body.. But on a crop sensor 14/17mm is just not *that* wide.. I doubt the effect the OP is looking for will be achieved. On a crop sensor, the Sigma 8-16 does incredible things to interior space.. But as someone said earlier, you do have to correct somewhat for distortion in post. But you'll have to do that regardless. I suggest renting it and giving it a go, if you are indeed on a crop sensor (APS-C) camera.
  9. dustin0479
    Offline

    dustin0479 New Member

    Joined:
    Oct 10, 2010
    Messages:
    228
    Likes Received:
    9
    Trophy Points:
    0
    Location:
    Delaware
    Gallery:
    Ratings:
    +9 / 0
    My Photos Are OK to Edit
    Sorry about that, I thought I had it in my sig.

    I use a d300 mostly but for wide angle I use a D700. We have Nikor 14mm and 14-24. The issue is the edge distortion stretching items and making them look out of place
  10. Mike_E
    Offline

    Mike_E Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Jan 26, 2007
    Messages:
    5,261
    Likes Received:
    249
    Trophy Points:
    63
    Location:
    The Upper West Side of Mississippi (you have no i
    Gallery:
    Ratings:
    +257 / 0
    My Photos Are OK to Edit

Share This Page

Search tags for this page
lense interior photo
,
best cameras for taking interior photos
,
best lens for home interior photos
,
best lens for interior design photography
,

best lens for interior photography

,
best lens for shooting interior rooms
,
best lens to use in bedrooms
,
best lenses for interior design
,
Best Nikon camera lense for interiors
,
best nikon lens for interior design shots
,
best wide angle lens for interior photography
,
camera inside room pics
,
interior photography lens
,
lens for interior design photography
,
lens for room interiors
,
macro or wide angle lense for shoiting interior design
,
what lens for interior design photography
,
what lens is good for pictures of rooms
,
what lense to use for room photo
,
wide angle for shooting rooms home