Lens hood choices...

Discussion in 'Photography Beginners' Forum' started by seekcreative, May 5, 2010.

  1. seekcreative

    seekcreative TPF Noob!

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    Whats the skinny on the difference between a tulip lens hood and a traditional full hood? I am sure there is a simple, logical reason and being a noob, I would like to be educated :)
     
  2. mrpink

    mrpink No longer a newbie, moving up!

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    "tulip" hoods are for lenses with non rotating front elements (when either focusing or zooming). Full hoods are for lenses with front elements that rotate.

    Pretty much, just use the hood that comes with your lens.




    p!nK
     
  3. Goontz

    Goontz TPF Noob!

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    Pink layed it out pretty good. Full hoods can cause vignetting on some lenses, so they need pedal-type hoods. Always use whichever one is made for that particular lens.
     
  4. mrpink

    mrpink No longer a newbie, moving up!

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    pros use pedal shaped hoods, thats how you can tell they are pros.





    p!nK
     
  5. Goontz

    Goontz TPF Noob!

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    "P" mode for Professional, Pedal hoods, Pro Photographers...it's all making sense to me now!
     
  6. Big Mike

    Big Mike I am Big, I am Mike Staff Member Supporting Member

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    The camera records an image that is rectangular, but the lens is round. A petal shaped hood covers the most area, without intruding into the image (which would cause vignetting). When you put a rectangle into a circle, the corners are where the interference would first occur, so that is where the 'cut outs' in the hood are, which gives us the petal shape.
     
  7. Derrel

    Derrel Mr. Rain Cloud

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    Yes, Big Mike layed it out very neatly. (Plus, petal hoods just look so doggone cool and modern, and of course the camera and lens makers know we all want what looks cool and modern!!!)
     
  8. seekcreative

    seekcreative TPF Noob!

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    Thanks Big Mike and Derrel. Well, I definitely want to be cool when I am snapping off clips on this T2i! Thanks for the info guys!
     
  9. Big Mike

    Big Mike I am Big, I am Mike Staff Member Supporting Member

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    Keep in mind what mrPink said at first. Petal hoods are usually only for lenses that don't have a rotating front element (or at least where the hood mount doesn't rotate).
     
  10. eriqalan

    eriqalan TPF Noob!

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    Vignetting (Vignetting - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia)

    Basically you will either have a partial darkening of the sides / corners (full frame / 35mm) if too deep or have too open a lens hood (effectively no lens hood) if too small (the hood is round the frame is rectangular) - a Tulip has larger sides for Top, Bottom and smaller for the sides, open for the corners so you get more even light

    If you have a Digital that is NOT full frame - you are only using the center of the lens anyway so vignetting is not a concern - You might want to look at rubber collapsibles as they also help protect the lens in a fall (soften the fall) where a metal hood will jar the lens

    Note: you can get most tulip hoods for about $8 with shipping included on ebay from hong kong (several sources) - search for your MM size "lens hood" or "flower petal"; collapsibles are about $5; these will NOT bayonet on as some cameras do but screw in as a filter does
     
  11. gryphonslair99

    gryphonslair99 Been spending a lot of time on here!

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    Lens manufacturers design their hoods to be the most effective for that particular lens. If you want to save yourself some grief, just use the proper OEM hood.
     
  12. cnutco

    cnutco No longer a newbie, moving up!

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    Y'all crack me up!:lmao:
     

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