Lens hood + polarizer

Discussion in 'Beyond the Basics' started by SLOShooter, Mar 2, 2005.

  1. SLOShooter

    SLOShooter TPF Noob!

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    Just wanted to know if anyone had any tips to spin a polarizer while you've got a lens hood on? I find it hard to spin the ring.
     
  2. ksmattfish

    ksmattfish Now 100% DC - not as cool as I once was, but still

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    You can get a rubber lens hood that screws onto the filter itself. Then you just turn the hood, and the ring turns.

    You can also cut a notch out of one side of the hood to allow your fingertip to go through and turn the hood. Some hoods come with a notch.
     
  3. SLOShooter

    SLOShooter TPF Noob!

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    I'm guessing the ones that spin are circular hoods? The one I have now is a petal and from my understanding spinning it would pretty much ruin any benefits of the petal shape.
     
  4. MostlyDigital

    MostlyDigital TPF Noob!

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    Uh oh, dumb question alert!.... Why spin the filter?
     
  5. Big Mike

    Big Mike I am Big, I am Mike Staff Member Supporting Member

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    A circular polarizing filter has two elements (I think) and you can vary the polarizing effect by rotating one element.
     
  6. MostlyDigital

    MostlyDigital TPF Noob!

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    Oh dam, i'm an idiot. Mine spins and I always wondered why.... hmm I have to figure out how to use it now...lol...
     
  7. SLOShooter

    SLOShooter TPF Noob!

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    You'll notice that if your shooting a sunny scene and you spin the polarizer the image that you see in the viewfinder will change because the amount of polarization is changing.
     
  8. ksmattfish

    ksmattfish Now 100% DC - not as cool as I once was, but still

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    Yes. The petal style hood is usually a bayonet mount, so that it always sets correctly aligned.
     
  9. ksmattfish

    ksmattfish Now 100% DC - not as cool as I once was, but still

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  10. Kodan_Txips

    Kodan_Txips TPF Noob!

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    Just a point, but it may be an important one.

    A linear polarising filter consists of only one sheet of glass, with some sort of "grid" manufactured within it.

    I anticipate that the same will be true with a "circular" polarising filter - it is just that the grid is cirular rather than running in parallel lines.

    Another point thus arises. A circular piece of glass can contain parallel lines, and be a linear filter. A square filter can have a concentric circular grid, and thus be a circular polariser.

    Don't be fooled by the physical shape of the filter, it is the grid pattern that counts.
     

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