Lens Hoods

Discussion in 'Photography Beginners' Forum' started by eric-holmes, Oct 5, 2009.

  1. eric-holmes

    eric-holmes No longer a newbie, moving up!

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    How interchangeable are lens hoods? I would like a different one for my camera but I don't know if I can trade them out. Right now I have a solid one and I would prefer one with the edges cut out.
     
  2. PhotoXopher

    PhotoXopher TPF Noob!

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    Lens specific.
     
  3. Goontz

    Goontz TPF Noob!

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    Yep - lens specific. Even if a different one might fit on another lens, you should use the one that's for your lens. Also, if the end of the lens turns when you focus, a petal hood is pointless. Why are you wanting a petal hood instead of solid?
     
  4. syphlix

    syphlix TPF Noob!

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    petal hood is prettier!
     
  5. ann

    ann No longer a newbie, moving up!

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    don't confuse function with pretty:lol:
     
  6. Randall Ellis

    Randall Ellis TPF Noob!

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    Some lenses, primarily wider angle lenses, require hoods that are cut differently to prevent them from vignetting the edges of the frame. If the lens you are using is not overly wide for the format you are using you should be able to use any generic rubber hood with it. These are inexpensive, so you might consider trying on to see if the corners of your images are darkened or not. If not you're good to go...

    - Randy
     
  7. Buckster

    Buckster Been spending a lot of time on here!

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    Strictly as a functionality issue, this is an interesting resource for the DIY types (I'm into the whole DIY thing):

    Free printable cardboard lens hoods

    With the templates provided as a starting point, and a bit of work with some stiff plastic or even sheet metal, and some black paint or gaffer's tape or something like that, someone with a bit of time and skill can make any lens hood they might need for pennies.
     
  8. easilyamused

    easilyamused TPF Noob!

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    Buckster,

    That site is really clever. What materials have you tried when you've made yours? I'm tempted to try to make one out of plastic, but I'm not sure what kind of plastic I'd need or where to get it.
     
  9. Goontz

    Goontz TPF Noob!

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    I bet chopping up the cover of one of those flimsy plastic binders would work well.
     
  10. Buckster

    Buckster Been spending a lot of time on here!

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    I haven't made one from plastic yet, but I'm thinking milk jug or 2 liter soda bottle would work pretty good, once covered or painted. I've made some out of cardboard covered in gaffer's tape that work fine.
     
  11. eric-holmes

    eric-holmes No longer a newbie, moving up!

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  12. Derrel

    Derrel Mr. Rain Cloud

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    One thing about lens hoods: virtually ALL older lenses and their hoods have been designed for use on FF cameras. On DX d-slr bodies, the hoods for those lenses are not long enough, or small diameter enough; because the APS-C d-slrs crop off so much of a lens's angle of view, you actually need a longer and/or more-restrictive lens hood than if using a FF body with the same lens.

    Soft, bendable rubber lens hoods work pretty well. The cutout or "petal" lens hoods look pretty cool, but circular hoods work well. One of the advantages of softer, bendable rubber hoods is that they can be squished a bit to throw a shadow on the front of the lens when shooting in extremely tough conditions, with the lens aimed toward a bright sun.

    Camera stores (does anybody remember those?) often have bins full of older lens hoods for $3-$5 each. You can often find a decent hood with a bit of fitting and checking for vignetting at minimum aperture (f/16, f/22) and close focus, aimed at a bright light source, like the sky. If the corners of the frme are darkened, the hood is too long or too narrow in diameter. On APS-C digital, the hood specified for an 85-90mm lens will work on a 50mm lens,and so on.
     

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