lens question

Discussion in 'Photography Beginners' Forum' started by Greg Oden, Sep 27, 2008.

  1. Greg Oden

    Greg Oden TPF Noob!

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    im going to be purchasing the nikon d90 as soon as i figure out this question. the kit it comes with includes the 18-105mm. i want more then that. if i were to purchase the 18-200mm would i never even need to use the 18-105mm. i dont want to get the 18-105mm if im not going to use it after i purchase the 18-200mm. so i guess thats my question. sorry im neeeeeeeeeeeeeeewwwwwwwwwww.
     
  2. beaminge36

    beaminge36 TPF Noob!

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    generally, you get what you pay for. You have several categories that define a lens. Focal range, aperture, build quality/optics and price. Price is a result of the combination of the frist 3. the 18-200 range at the pro level is generally composed of 2 to 3 lenses. someting like 12-24, 24-70 and 70-200. Each of which is over $1000 with aperatures of 2.8 or so. To keep the price down and include all those focal ranges, the sacrifice went to build quality and aperature (as a comparison, each of those lenses is probably bigger and heavier then the 18-200). Not saying its a bad lens, just may not be adequate for what you want to capture. Depending on your intented use, it may be slow or soft. On the other hand, it has a very comprehensive focal range. I think the 18-105 is a great focal range. If you were to buy a second lens I would go for the 70-200 f/4. Same price as the 18-200 but is better at the dedicated ranges as it aims for a zoom telephoto lens rather then wide to telephoto zoom. The benifit of a large focal range is counter balanced by the benefit of the more specialized lenses as far as wide aperatures, image quality and sharpness. Hope this helps your decision/info gathering process,

    Nick
     
  3. aramator

    aramator TPF Noob!

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    i think it depends on what you are mostly doing. if you want to do portaits and stuff you need a lower(number) f/. the longer the lens usually means a higher(number) f/. like an f/1.8 has a smaller focus plain than an f/4.5. the smaller the number the less will be in focus besides your subject. so decide what you want to do more of and decide on that factor. but hey im kinda newbish so see what other people say.
     
  4. beaminge36

    beaminge36 TPF Noob!

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    Like aramator said, its really what you are looking for as far as benefits and photography style. If you want a light walk-around lens for landscape os anything during daylight, this lens will be great. But if you cherish sharpness and low-light performance, maybe a prime or a more dedicated lens will be the better choice. Just what i've noticed and read. Post your intentions and goals for the lens.

    Nick
     
  5. Greg Oden

    Greg Oden TPF Noob!

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    thanks for the responses. im very new. i dont know much. i do know im buying a d90. i do know i want a nice macro lens. i do know i want a nice telephoto lens. i want to package the lenses with the camera when i buy it, i just want to make sure i get the lenses i want. i will be filming mainly wildlife
     
  6. beaminge36

    beaminge36 TPF Noob!

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    From what I understand from the other forum members, the ideal wildlife range is in the 200-400 range. I know canon makes a nice 100-400mm lens that is ideal for wild life but at 70-200 with a 1.4 extender gives a very usable range. Not sure what your budget is but thats what has been recomended for wildlife photography. Also not sure on the nikkor equivalents to the canon lenses. Alot of the basic lenses are the same so theres a good change they have very similar range lenses. Google these ranges and see what you find. I'm sure there's a wealth of knowledge out there.

    Nick
     

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