Lense for a Canon 3000N / type, specs, compatibility

Discussion in 'Photography Beginners' Forum' started by sp_key, Nov 23, 2006.

  1. sp_key

    sp_key TPF Noob!

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    Hi All,

    I have recently started taking pictures and I'm now captivated!

    Unfortunately I haven't got a DSLR yet and I'm not planning to buy one for some time. I recently baught a 35mm Canon 3000N from Czech Republic while on holiday for only a 100Euros.

    I am now planning to buy a new lense but am slightly confused on a few things.

    1) What type of lense is most appropriate/necessary for a beginner? (macro, telephoto zoom, widelense) and what brands are compatible with my Canon apart from Canon of course. :)

    2) What tech specs should my first lense possess? I understand there is a relationship between the lense and the camera sensor (the smaller the sensor the bigger the magnification) but I do not know the size of my Canon's 3000N sensor (I wasn't given a manual, I wouldn't be able to read it anyway)

    3) Will I be able to use my new lense (for the 3000N) on a DSLR when and if I manage to upgrade?

    Thanks in advance.
     
  2. Big Mike

    Big Mike I am Big, I am Mike Staff Member Supporting Member

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    Welcome to the forum.

    Your new camera is part of Canon's EOS camera line...and is therefore compatible with any of Canon's EF lenses. Several other companies make lenses to fit EOS cameras. Sigma, Tamron, Vivitar etc. They should be listed as "Canon EOS, or Canon Autofocus"

    They type of lens you buy...depends on they type of shooting you like to do...so use the lens you have...until you figure out where it is lacking.

    I suggest getting a 50mm F1.8 lens. It should be inexpensive but give you great images. It has a wide maximum aperture (F1.8 )...which is really nice to have.

    Firstly, the sensor size has no impact on 'magnification'...that is the lens. However, a smaller sensor will mean the camera has a narrower field of view.

    Secondly...your camera uses film...there is no sensor :D When we talk about sensors...that is the device in a digital camera that acts as film and captures the image.

    Yes :D But here is where the size of the sensor kicks in. Most DSLR cameras have a sensor that is smaller than the 35mm film that you are used to. So the view that you see when you use your film camera...will be different when you put the same lens onto the digital camera.
     
  3. sp_key

    sp_key TPF Noob!

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    haha, mine has both film and a sensor (well hidden though)... I'm coming from an AT-1 and all these automations are definitely a proof my camera HAAAAAS A SENSOR... I thought.

    Thanks Mike. I shall take your advice.

    By the way, I won't sue canon for the lack of a sensor in my camera...
     
  4. Alex_B

    Alex_B No longer a newbie, moving up!

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    Well, THAT sensor is the one used for light metering and focussing before the mirror swings ;)

    That is fairly different from the imaging sensor in DSLRs, which only sees light in the moment you take the picture.

    Your sensor in that latter sense is your film, so its size is standard 35mm ... which corresponds to what people today call a full frame sensor in DSLRs.

    Most DSLRs have smaller sensors (often called "crop sensors"), which narrow your field of view as stated correctly above. This again, in terms of which part of the scene you are able to capture on your sensor when standing away at a given distance, corresponds to an effective shift in focal length.
    Therefore a 1.6 crop (1.6 with respect to full frame) sensor means that a 50mm lens translates into a 1.6x50mm lens.
    However, there are other issues like depth of field, so this 1.6 translation does not really work in every respect.

    Anyway, I own a 35mm Canon film-SLR .. and love it :)
     

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