Lense for Wedding

Discussion in 'Beyond the Basics' started by chocolate1ash, Jan 30, 2008.

  1. chocolate1ash

    chocolate1ash TPF Noob!

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    I'm shooting my brothers wedding in May. I'm confused as to what lense to get and use for the wedding. I have a 28-105mm and a 50mm 1.8. I used the 50 mm for a portrait shoot and wasn't very thrilled with it, maybe I'm doing something wrong. It seemed that only the close up pictures turned out good. The 28-105mm is just heavy and sensitive to movement. Any suggestions???
     
  2. Socrates

    Socrates TPF Noob!

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    It sounds like you have a Nikon. Assuming that you have a DX-sized sensor (you paid less than $5000 for the camera body), then 50 mm would be ideal for portraits. You'd want the lens pretty much wide open with the subject roughly eight feet distant. That will cause the subject to be clear but everything else out of focus. That's what I do with the 50 mm f/1.4 BUT bear in mind that the f/1.4 is a significantly different (and better) lens, especially at large apertures.

    Check this out to see what I mean:
    http://web.mac.com/george.dick/Photos/Katie.html
     
  3. Trenton Romulox

    Trenton Romulox TPF Noob!

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    Try less than $5,000? D3 is the only full-frame Nikon digital, isn't it?

    I'd consider a 24-70 or 28-70 f/2.8 zoom. They are both great lenses.
     
  4. photogincollege

    photogincollege TPF Noob!

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    Whats your budget? If your using a nikon, and budget isnt an option, everyone raves about the 17-55 2.8 for cropped bodies, but its very expensive, the 70-200 2.8 is also excellent , but again very expensive. I know tamron makes a 17-50 2.8 which is said to be decent and its only around 500. If your full frame, everyone seems to love the 24-70 2.8. Oh also a good alternative to the 70-200 2.8 is the 80-200 2.8. Its a very very good lens for about 800 to 1000.
     
  5. Socrates

    Socrates TPF Noob!

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    Darn! You just made me edit my post. I don't like being wrong but I really hate getting caught at it!
     
  6. Trenton Romulox

    Trenton Romulox TPF Noob!

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    Ha. I win. :p

    We all make mistakes. :]
     
  7. Socrates

    Socrates TPF Noob!

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    Be forewarned...
    Revenge is sweet (and I'm good at it).

    Cheers!
     
  8. Big Mike

    Big Mike I am Big, I am Mike Staff Member Supporting Member

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    My first suggestion would be to hire a pro to shoot the wedding. This is a once in a lifetime event that deserves a professional...plus, that would give you the opportunity to enjoy the day.

    Maybe that's not a possibility though.

    For shooting weddings, you want 'fast' lenses (having a large maximum aperture). The 50mm F1.8 would be a good start. If you are going to use a zoom lens, a maximum aperture of F2.8 is recommended.
    You could probably get by without, but you would need a good flash.

    Of course, if you are going to be responsible for shooting a wedding...having backup equipment is rather important.
     
  9. EOS_JD

    EOS_JD TPF Noob!

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    +1 for Mike's suggestions - particularly backups (if you are the only shooter).

    If you still want to be talking after the wedding.....hire a pro.
     
  10. Turn

    Turn TPF Noob!

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    Your 50 should be a great portrait lens on a crop. To me it sounds like you're a little unsure of yourself- probably not the best way to head into shooting a wedding...So this is where i too will say, hire the pro.

    But if you are going to shoot this, i might suggest renting a second body or borrowing one from a friend. Keep it on your shoulder and you can have two lenses ready to go instead of having to change out and miss shots. If you are going to shoot the 28-105 and it's too heavy to i'd say get a monopod.

    I use a 70-200 2.8 IS and a 24-70 2.8 (since the original question was for suggestions on lenses)
     
  11. Mike_E

    Mike_E No longer a newbie, moving up!

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    The 24-70mm VR is $1800 or there about.
    A 28-70mm AF-S is around $1200 for an EX+ copy.
    The 17-55 is around $1200 new.
    A Tamron is around 500 for either I think.

    Will you be able to use flash in the wedding? You will need to ask the Minister/Priest/Rabi to find out for sure.

    If you can use a flash then an 18-70 would do fine with a good flash technique and a better bounce card (google that to find out how to make one). If you would rather have something that looks more expensive then go here http://www.dembflashproducts.com/

    If the church is big enough to warrant a big zoom then a Pro is probably in the budget and she should go that rout. If she will let you pick one out maybe they will let you assist and give you some pointers while you are at it.

    OK, now for the best advice. IF a pro isn't in the budget, then hire one yourself for a morning or afternoon to go over your equipment. What you are going to need. And then show you some techniques that you will be using and should be Practicing before hand! You will need to explain what is going on and may have to make several phone calls to find someone who will agree to help but I don't think that it will take too long to make a connection. You might also get to assist in a wedding or two if you ask nicely. (Free to the photographer of course)

    Do expect to pay for this and Do follow the advice.

    HTH,

    mike
     

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