Lense Question

Discussion in 'Photography Equipment & Products' started by Zabimaru, Sep 15, 2008.

  1. Zabimaru

    Zabimaru TPF Noob!

    Joined:
    Sep 12, 2008
    Messages:
    32
    Likes Received:
    0
    Can others edit my Photos:
    Photos OK to edit
    Sorry for being such a noob, this is probably a simple question.

    Is a 'macro' lense just a lense that's 100mm or more. Every time someone mentions a macro lense it looks like one of the massive lenses(again, over 100mm) that cost a fortune.

    Don't get me wrong i understand the whole point of a macro photograph is to have a shallow depth of field where you focus on a particular part of your subject and have everything else blurred out. (differential focus?)

    It's just the lenses that confuse me...there's so many different ones lol.
     
  2. tirediron

    tirediron Watch the Birdy! Staff Member Supporting Member

    Joined:
    Jul 8, 2005
    Messages:
    37,338
    Likes Received:
    10,648
    Location:
    Victoria, BC
    Can others edit my Photos:
    Photos OK to edit
    There's no need apologize for being new; however you do appear slightly confused about the purpose of a macro lens. A macro lens is one which is specifically designed to focus closely enough on a subject to produce an image on the sensor the same size as the original, or 1:1. A by-product of the optical design of macro lenses is that they do have very shallow depth of field, resulting in only very narrow areas (as little as a millimeter or less) being in focus.

    Macro lenses are commonly available in 60mm and 105mm, and less commonly in FL as short as 40mm and as long as 200mm. Note that many of the longer FL lenses are not true macro lenses, that is, they do not focus closely enough to produce a 1:1 ratio image. Lenses which will only produce 1:2 and 1:3 ratio images (1/2 size and 1/3 size) are often incorrectly called macro lenses.

    Hope that helps.
     
  3. Battou

    Battou No longer a newbie, moving up!

    Joined:
    May 10, 2007
    Messages:
    7,997
    Likes Received:
    26
    Location:
    Slapamonkey, New York
    Can others edit my Photos:
    Photos NOT OK to edit
    noooo, you have a lot to learn about Macro. Macro is close up photography.

    And no a Macro lens is not a lens that's 100mm or more. A macro lens is a lens with an extremely short focusing distance and magnification qualities.

    *EDIT*
    Well since tirediron beat me to the punch I won't edit in the more detailed explination as he has that covered well enough
     
    Last edited: Sep 15, 2008
  4. Zabimaru

    Zabimaru TPF Noob!

    Joined:
    Sep 12, 2008
    Messages:
    32
    Likes Received:
    0
    Can others edit my Photos:
    Photos OK to edit
    oh, i see.

    So if i wanted a lense that could zoom in from a very far distance i would want something different. Macro is for close-ups only.


    learn something new every day. :thumbup:

    thanks.
     
  5. What you mean is "Telephoto" - the ability to get in close on something far away.
     
  6. Overread

    Overread has a hat around here somewhere Staff Member Supporting Member

    Joined:
    May 1, 2008
    Messages:
    23,093
    Likes Received:
    3,763
    Location:
    UK - England
    Can others edit my Photos:
    Photos OK to edit
    Macro lenses function like normal lenses - a 100mm lens and a 100mm macro lens will both allow give the same results at the same distances and settings, however the macro will allow you to focus the lens far closer to the subject than the 100mm will. This allows you to get right up close (very close) and get the magnifcation ratio of 1:1 when the lens is at its full closest. That produces all the closeup insect photos that you see.

    Also to clarify Tirediron Macro Prime lenses (those with a single focal length - ie no zoom) in any focal range tend to always be 1:1 - ie true macro. There are some exceptions to this - some 50mm macro lenses are budget grade and thus only achive 1:1 with a maro adaptor. The maro zoom lenses on the other hand - tend to be the opposite - nearly all are just close focusing, which limits them to 1:2 macro (which means less magnifcation) this can be limiting when dealing with smaller subjects.

    Also there is the canon MPE 65mm 5:1 which is the only macro lens (that I know of) which does not function in the normal manner and instead allows macro up to 5 times that of a normal macro lens - the trade off is that it is the most difficult lens to master and learn to use and it is also only able to do maro work - it does not focus at normal distances
     
  7. Edward Crim

    Edward Crim TPF Noob!

    Joined:
    Apr 27, 2008
    Messages:
    37
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    St. Louis, Missouri
    Can others edit my Photos:
    Photos NOT OK to edit
    I use 3 Olympus OM macro lenses on my Canon cameras:
    a 38mm f2.8 bellows lens that magnifies as much as 6.7x life size
    a 50mm f3.5 that goes to 1/2 life size (1:1 with an extension tube)
    and a bellows 135 f4.5 that magnifies to 1/2 life size

    Olympus also made a 20mm f2 macro (13.6x) and 80mm f4 bellows and a 50mm f2 and a 90mm f2 macro that focused from infinity to 1:2

    Also, depth of field in a particular format is controlled by aperture and magnification. It is not a function of lens design per se.
     
  8. Bifurcator

    Bifurcator TPF Noob!

    Joined:
    Jun 1, 2008
    Messages:
    3,312
    Likes Received:
    1
    Location:
    Japan
    Can others edit my Photos:
    Photos OK to edit
    Last edited: Sep 15, 2008
  9. tirediron

    tirediron Watch the Birdy! Staff Member Supporting Member

    Joined:
    Jul 8, 2005
    Messages:
    37,338
    Likes Received:
    10,648
    Location:
    Victoria, BC
    Can others edit my Photos:
    Photos OK to edit
    Thanks! I sort of wandered off into two things at once there!
     

Share This Page