Lenses

Discussion in 'Photography Beginners' Forum' started by snaggle, Jun 2, 2009.

  1. snaggle

    snaggle TPF Noob!

    Joined:
    Apr 6, 2009
    Messages:
    105
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    Wainwright AB
    Can others edit my Photos:
    Photos NOT OK to edit
    I am looking at a new lens for my camera (Canon XSi). I have been looking at Vistek, they have a good online search function. Any ways I did a search for EF mount lenses and you can anrrow down your search buy DSLR Lenes Full Frame or DSLR Lenses Non-Full Frame. I am looking for just about any lens, I am not sure what I want to do yet. If I select Non-Full Frame I only get 10 lenses to choose from, If I dont change an thing I get 70. Will It mater if I use a full frame lens on my XSi? I know that a Full Frame lens is based off 35mm, so how much would be cut if I use it on my XSi? Also would my view finder picture be and diferent then the final picture?

    Here is the link for the search, Find Your Lens DSLR Lenses Full Frame Camera Lenses Canon Zoom Lenses Telephoto Lenses

    Here are the Lenses I am looking at,

    Canon EF 100-300mm f/4.5-5.6 USM Telephoto Zoom Lens DSLR Lenses Full Frame 2565A003 - Vistek Canada Product Detail

    Canon EF 50mm f/2.5 Macro Lens DSLR Lenses Full Frame 2537A003 - Vistek Canada Product Detail

    Canon EF 35mm f/2.0 Wide Angle Lens DSLR Lenses Full Frame 2507A002 - Vistek Canada Product Detail

    Tokina AF 10-17mm f/3.5-4.5 ATX DX Canon Fisheye Lens DSLR Lenses Non-Full Frame ATX107DXC - Vistek Canada Product Detail

    Any advice on if these would be any good or not, limitations, or what you would choose diferent would be greatly acepted.
     
  2. Overread

    Overread has a hat around here somewhere Staff Member Supporting Member

    Joined:
    May 1, 2008
    Messages:
    23,099
    Likes Received:
    3,765
    Location:
    UK - England
    Can others edit my Photos:
    Photos OK to edit
    Firstly using an EF lens (fullframe lens ) on a crop sensor camera is no bad thing - all that happens is the outer edges of the image captured by the glass is not shown through the viewfinder nor captured by the sensor (what you see in the viewfinder is what you get on the shot). Infact the middle area of a lens are often the most accurate so its no degradation in image quality.
    If course a crop sensor only lens will never not work on a fullframe camera - also bare in mind that there are no crop sensor L grade lenses - this is not because they are not good, but because canon keep the L grade for fullframe lenses only. So there are some great EFS lenses out there.

    As for the lenses you list I would take the 50mm macro off the list - its only a half macro lens (the macro line is marketing) unless you combine it with a macro adaptor - at which point the combined cost is more than the EFS 60mm macro and is near to the cost of a 100mm macro.

    At the wide end consider the sigma 10-20mm - on a crop sensor camera is a very popular and good landscape lens
     
  3. snaggle

    snaggle TPF Noob!

    Joined:
    Apr 6, 2009
    Messages:
    105
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    Wainwright AB
    Can others edit my Photos:
    Photos NOT OK to edit
    Thanks for the responce. I am looking to use the Macro lense for my fish tank so I need to be able to be close. Is there a better lense then the one I have chosen for this?
     
  4. Overread

    Overread has a hat around here somewhere Staff Member Supporting Member

    Joined:
    May 1, 2008
    Messages:
    23,099
    Likes Received:
    3,765
    Location:
    UK - England
    Can others edit my Photos:
    Photos OK to edit
    For what your thinking you don't have to be close - macro from a 60mm lens will give the same image as macro from a 180mm lens - the differences is that the 180mm wil let you work from further back, it costs far more than the 60mm and it is heavier too.
    Firstly do you have any interest in bugs at all - if you do then look for macro lenses at least 90mm or longer (eg Tamron 90mm macro, Canon 100mm macro, Sigma 105mm macro); if your just doing the fish and a few other odd subjects then you might not need such a long lens - though with the tank glass you might find it prefer able to have a longer macro lens incase some fish hide at the back.

    Also for glass your going to get horrible reflection problems - a circular polarizer and good lighting control are going to be important things to learn and have.
     

Share This Page