Light spill help

Discussion in 'Lighting and Hardware' started by TylerF, Jul 10, 2017.

  1. TylerF

    TylerF TPF Noob!

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    sorry if this is in the wrong section. Feel free to move or delete.

    I've been having issues with light spill when shooting indoors. The other night I was trying to aim a colored light into a white wall to make a colored background. Without adding my flash in, I got the desired look but as soon as I added my softbox/speedlite it completely washed out the wall.

    I tried moving the subject further away and still nothing. I'm just confused. I was shooting in the dark, exposed for the ambient light and built up my flash but it still didn't work.

    Thanks!


     
  2. tirediron

    tirediron Watch the Birdy! Staff Member Supporting Member

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    Was the coloured light a continuous light or another strobe? If it was a continuous light, than the speedlight simply overpowered it. There are two solutions: (1) Use a speedlight for the background colour as well and balance the power with the key light; or (2) Move the key light much closer to the subject, lowering the power accordingly, and use a stronger bulb for the background. If you're already using a speedlight on the background, it's simply a matter of balancing the power of background against key.
     
  3. TylerF

    TylerF TPF Noob!

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    Thanks for the input. The colored light was continuous. I had my speed light dialed down as much as possible but still wasn't working. I seem to always have this issue when shooting in the dark even without the colored light. Is my approach wrong?

    1- set ISO
    2- use shutter speed to get ambient the way I like
    3- add light(s)
    4- adjust aperture to control lights

    I always seem to get more light than I want on the background unless I put a speed light behind the model and fire at their back.
     
  4. tirediron

    tirediron Watch the Birdy! Staff Member Supporting Member

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    The main issue with your approach is trying to mix continuous and strobed light. It may not look like it to your eye, but there is a HUGE difference between the amount of light your speedlight is putting out, and the amount coming from the continuous light. What ISO were you using?
     
  5. TylerF

    TylerF TPF Noob!

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    I believe I was at 100. But I seem to even have this issue when I'm just trying to make a black background. The light seems to spill onto the wall behind the subject
     
  6. tirediron

    tirediron Watch the Birdy! Staff Member Supporting Member

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    Are you using a speedlight or a mono(studio)light, and what model? It sounds like your light is pointing too much to the back. Does yoru softbox have a recessed face tlhta will allow you to feather the light?
     
  7. TylerF

    TylerF TPF Noob!

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    I have an sb600 in a medium apollo soft box and an impact 24" hexi box. Very low budget equipment I know lol
     
  8. tirediron

    tirediron Watch the Birdy! Staff Member Supporting Member

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    A big part of your issue is probably distance. My studio has a LOT of windows and several skylights. When I'm shooting at mid-day, I need a lot of power from my strobes and consequently a LOT of space between subject and background. Typically I am working with the key light 3-5' from the subject and the background 10-15' behind the subject.
     
  9. Designer

    Designer Been spending a lot of time on here!

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    Aside from the significant difference in power levels between the two types of lighting, you need to experiment with the position of the softbox and/or grid the softbox. You are literally putting light onto the background. If you can't install a deep grid to the softbox, then at least try to fashion some barn doors using found materials. A second speedlight should be on your wish list.
     
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  10. adamhiram

    adamhiram No longer a newbie, moving up!

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    You might also want to try using some flags to block spill onto the background. I've used a stepladder with some black posterboard taped onto it, or cardboard from some amazon boxes if I needed something larger. Doesn't get more low budget than that!
     
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