Lighting equip for Nikon D60

Discussion in 'Digital Discussion & Q&A' started by PastTheFuture, Jul 21, 2009.

  1. PastTheFuture

    PastTheFuture TPF Noob!

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    I have a Nikon D60 and I was just wondering what would be some good lighting equipment to go with it. Preferably relatively cheap. I don't need anything fancy, just something good ;) Thanks for any help received.
     
  2. DRB022

    DRB022 TPF Noob!

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    You can use any of Nikon's speedlights. An SB400 or SB600 would be good.
     
  3. PastTheFuture

    PastTheFuture TPF Noob!

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    Thank you, I'll look into though.

    In addition to flashes, I'm always wanting to look at some studio lights. Any suggestions?
     
  4. benhasajeep

    benhasajeep TPF Noob!

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    Inexpensive and studio strobes really don't mix. :lol: Quite a few people on here like Alienbee's.

    For basic studio work, an SB-800 / SB-900 used with 1 or 2 nikon SB-600's will provide plenty of power for quite a bit of different situations. Using a SB-800 or SB-900 will allow you (D60) to use wireless flash. Can do without the SB-800/900, but would need to go with wired flashes. Or buy a set of radio triggers. And even less expensive flashes like the workhorse Vivitar 285 will work in studio with radio triggers and the D60. Check out Strobist.com for lots of information on the capabilities of flash photography. And lots and lots of instruction and tips.

    As for studio strobes. Even the cheap china ones are a couple hundred for anything with more power than a flash. And again they are not as portable. I have a set of inexpensive (compared to bigger brand name one) from ebay, and honnestly I use my Nikon SB's more often. Now I don't get into doing elaborate set ups like some do. Mostly 3-4 light set ups without many modifiers or gels or any of that stuff. Basically a soft box or umbrella, maybe a reflector.
     
  5. KmH

    KmH Helping photographers learn to fish Supporting Member

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    The basic studio lights are purchased at a hardware store.

    Clamp type utility lights with daylight balanced bulbs and reflectors have been used for years by novice photographers, as the starting point for learning how to light in a studio setting.

    When it comes to good, that is more a function of the photographer, than the lights.
     
  6. PastTheFuture

    PastTheFuture TPF Noob!

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    Alright, thanks guys. I think I'll go with what Ben said. As I said, preferably cheap, but not necessary. I have about $2000 I can spend, but I'd like to keep some of it for college ;)
     
  7. Applefanboy

    Applefanboy TPF Noob!

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    Alien bees are solid if you are willing to spend the money. Maybe find some old white lightenings used on ebay?
     
  8. Rere

    Rere TPF Noob!

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    I use the Excalibar (don't know about this spelling) for my studio lighting. This studio setup isn't (or wasn't when I bought it) too inexpensive--but not like a lot of the lighting systems. But it is portable and I take in on location frequently. Have had it for aprox 5 years. It works great with all of my Nikons. With the D60 it's awesome. I use the on-camera flash to slave trigger the strobes. I also use the large 60" umbrellas bounced onto the subject. I don't usually use a tripod and can move around the subject and room to get the best shots--which is extremely important with pets.

    I also have two SB800s, and tried to use them for portrait lighting. Did not have good results. And I tried all of the ways they recommended. I believe that even if you used a third one, there might still be problems. They were also a pain to use. You really need larger lighting if you are going to do real studio quality work. You get shadows of varying degrees when trying to light a large area with the SB800s--in my experience.

    I do sometimes use the SB800s outside, though. I also have a Sigma macro ring flash for product photography and can use it for a simple one person or animal portrait where I don't want shadows. The Sigma and the SB800s were not cheap.

    I do different kinds of photography, some in my studio, but more than half on-location: portraits, family reunions (here you really have to have a studio set-up), lots of pets, models, products, taekwondo, wildlife, website and commercial, and everything in-between.
     
  9. PhotoXopher

    PhotoXopher TPF Noob!

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    I have an SB-400 and 2 SB-600's, about 90% of the time the SB-400 is mounted. I personally think it's one of the most under rated flashes on the market.

    For what it is, it's incredibly awesome (and the price is right).

    If money is a concern it fits the bill quite nicely.
     
  10. PastTheFuture

    PastTheFuture TPF Noob!

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    Would this be the Excalibur you are talking about, or at least something similar to this? It looks rather nice for that price. I could afford that easily.

    So you prefer the SB-400 to the SB-600? I've been encouraged by one of my friends to get the SB-600.
     
  11. PhotoXopher

    PhotoXopher TPF Noob!

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    No, I don't prefer the SB-400 over the SB-600 - it's just smaller and almost always with me because of it. Plus I don't look (as much) like a freak at family get togethers :lol:

    The SB-600 is a better flash, without a doubt.
     
  12. PastTheFuture

    PastTheFuture TPF Noob!

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    I was looking at getting the SB-600 anyways. Who cares if you look like a freak at family get togethers? They're family, they shouldn't care! :lol:
     

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