Lighting

Discussion in 'Beyond the Basics' started by Mom2Kaden, Feb 5, 2005.

  1. Mom2Kaden

    Mom2Kaden TPF Noob!

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    I am always trying to do home photo shots of my 9 month old son. I try to use natural light but that's not always possible. I don't want to spend a fortune on a lighting kit. What can I use that would be relatively inexpensive? Thanks
    Shana
     
  2. Joanne4

    Joanne4 TPF Noob!

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    Just bumping this up as I would also like to know the answer
     
  3. Patrick

    Patrick TPF Noob!

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    I purchased an Impact tungsten light kit from B&H mid last year and have been very pleased with the results I'm getting.

    Here's a link to what I bought.
    http://www.bhphotovideo.com/bnh/controller/home?O=productlist&A=details&Q=&sku=298604&is=REG

    I figured 199 wasn't too bad of a price to get me started.

    I'll admit that sometime in the future I would like to get a strobe kit, but this will more than do for now. Just wish they didn't heat up the room so much:confused:

    Hope this helps.
     
  4. Alison

    Alison Swiss Army Friend Supporting Member

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    What kind of camera are you using? If you don't already have one, I think an off camera flash is about the best bet you have for a fairly small price tag. Before I opened my business I shot only with my external flash and got very good results.
     
  5. Rogue Monk

    Rogue Monk TPF Noob!

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    You can also look into just buying the slave bulbs (not sure this is the right name--it resembles a regular lightbulb) from a well stocked photography store. These can screw into most light sockets, burn brighter, whiter and hotter (be careful when you unscrew it afterwards) and die faster. I'm not sure what the price is nowadays, but when I was starting, my friend and I would buy a couple of these. Then, we could forgo the flash if required.

    Usually, just one and some white foamcore (for reflecting to reduce harsh shadows) in combination with the room or ambient light will be plenty.

    Remember that it can be hot though. You don't want to overheat the little tike (not that you would...I'm just saying it to no-one in general).
     

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