Lighting

Discussion in 'Beyond the Basics' started by cowbert098, Dec 26, 2003.

  1. cowbert098

    cowbert098 TPF Noob!

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    I would like to indoor photos of objects. I want to purchase some sort of lighting but I want it to be affordable as well. I have a photography book that says you can purchase "hobbyist" lighting with a couple lamps and a diffuser. Where would I buy such a thing and where can I learn about them. Thanks!
     
  2. Face

    Face TPF Noob!

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    if you want to do it really bootleg (like everything I do...) you can use some regular house lights, a sheet for the backdrop, and a sheet in front of a light to diffuse it.
     
  3. seanarmenta

    seanarmenta TPF Noob!

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    home depot :)
     
  4. craig

    craig TPF Noob!

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    I would go with foamcore as bounce, and tungsten film, or the 3200kelvin on your camera, and a tripod. I wouldn't buy anything until all the existing light options (with tungsten, tripod etc) have been exhausted. Theese guys have everything. http://www.bhphotovideo.com/bnh6/controller/home
     
  5. Sterling_Sinner

    Sterling_Sinner TPF Noob!

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    Here's what I have for lights......
    I have 2 metal light hoods with clips that they sell in Wal-Mart for mechanics. You can buy many different kinds of lights to put in them and they can clip onto your surroundings
    I have a halogen light workstand. That is 2 halogen lights on a tripod
    I also have a hand-held halogen worklamp with hook and clamp.

    I made a home-made diffuser and use large sheets for backdrops.

    Go home-made and you can't go wrong. Why drop the bucks into buying official lights when you can just rig your own set up? As we say in the Army.... Work smarter, not harder, hooah!
     
  6. dreadpyrat

    dreadpyrat TPF Noob!

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    Sterling, I want to go homemade too! How did you make your diffuser? And what type of lamps or bulbs do you use in your light hoods? I assume those hoods aer basically reflectors, right? Lastly, can you or someone explain a general lighting layout for photogrpahing an object indoors? I understand that every subject is unique; I'm looking for more of: "two lights in front of and at 45 degrees to subject plus one above for rim lighting" ....that sort of thing.
    Thanks!
     
  7. PortraitMan

    PortraitMan TPF Noob!

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    This is real simple and takes just a roll for trial and error, but if you have a flash with a swivel head on it you can set your object near a white wall and bounce the flash off the wall. Try it from different positions to get the right modeling, but it's quick and easy. A light colored sheet as a background behind the object should reflect some of the light giving dimension.

    -Tom.
     

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