Little woody

Discussion in 'General Gallery' started by walter23, Jan 7, 2005.

  1. walter23

    walter23 TPF Noob!

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    [​IMG]

    The light as you can see is a bit harsh. Half hour of burning and dodging in photoshop to get it to this state, which is about as good as it will get I think.
     
  2. tmpadmin

    tmpadmin TPF Noob!

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    ahem... nice title. very nice photo!
     
  3. railman44

    railman44 TPF Noob!

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    I think you have two pictures combined in one. Crop the big piece of wood at the bottom out of the picture and what remains is very nice. Now look at what you cropped out. That too makes an interesting picture.
     
  4. elsaspet

    elsaspet TPF Noob!

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    I have a question Walter....I love these kinds of photos. How do you get all that detail from your feet to infinity? Is it a setting or a position your in or what?
     
  5. elsaspet

    elsaspet TPF Noob!

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    Lol at tmpadmin! I had the same chuckle :lol:
     
  6. walter23

    walter23 TPF Noob!

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    Well, in this case, it was a cheap digital camera that has a 'landscape' mode. Most certainly this mode just does what a photographer would do shooting landscapes with a real camera instead of a toy, which is choose settings and a lens that gives a large 'depth of field':

    1. Use a relatively wide lens. 28mm equivalent in the case of this photo.
    2. Use a small aperture. Most people use f/11 or f/16 or more on landscapes.
    3. Set focus at the 'hyperfocal distance' instead of infinity. Look up hyperfocal distance in a photography book or on google - basically it's the point you can focus on at which the farthest point in focus will be at "infinity" but the nearest point that's in focus will be closer than it would be were you focused on infinity. Hyperfocal distance depends on aperture and focal length, because it relates to the size of your depth of field. To rephrase, you focus on something a bit closer than infinity but still have infinity in focus, and in return your nearest focus is even closer than it would be otherwise.
     
  7. elsaspet

    elsaspet TPF Noob!

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    Thank you for your response Walter. It was Greek to me which means tomorrow I'm gonna have to print out your reply and hit the books.
    I really love the photo.
     
  8. walter23

    walter23 TPF Noob!

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    Heh, okay.

    Check this tutorial out, it's useful:

    http://www.silverlight.co.uk/tutorials/toc.html
     

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